IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jorssb/v64y2002i3p321-348.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Chain graph models and their causal interpretations

Author

Listed:
  • Steffen L. Lauritzen
  • Thomas S. Richardson

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Steffen L. Lauritzen & Thomas S. Richardson, 2002. "Chain graph models and their causal interpretations," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 64(3), pages 321-348.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssb:v:64:y:2002:i:3:p:321-348
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1467-9868.00340
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kenneth I. Wolpin & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2000. "Natural "Natural Experiments" in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(4), pages 827-874, December.
    2. David B. Gross & Nicholas S. Souleles, 2002. "Do Liquidity Constraints and Interest Rates Matter for Consumer Behavior? Evidence from Credit Card Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 149-185.
    3. Peter Spirtes & Thomas Richardson & Christopher Meek & Richard Scheines & Clark Glymour, 1998. "Using Path Diagrams as a Structural Equation Modeling Tool," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 27(2), pages 182-225, November.
    4. Fisher, Franklin M, 1970. "A Correspondence Principle for Simultaneous Equation Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 38(1), pages 73-92, January.
    5. R. Bentzel & B. Hansen, 1954. "On Recursiveness and Interdependency in Economic Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(3), pages 153-168.
    6. Meyer, Bruce D, 1995. "Natural and Quasi-experiments in Economics," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(2), pages 151-161, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Javier Pérez & A. Sánchez, 2011. "Is there a signalling role for public wages? Evidence for the euro area based on macro data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 421-445, October.
    2. Hogun Chong & Mary Zey & David A. Bessler, 2010. "On corporate structure, strategy, and performance: a study with directed acyclic graphs and PC algorithm," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(1), pages 47-62.
    3. repec:eee:eejocm:v:26:y:2018:i:c:p:1-18 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Miljkovic, Dragan & Dalbec, Nathan & Zhang, Lei, 2016. "Estimating dynamics of US demand for major fossil fuels," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 284-291.
    5. Oxley, Les & Reale, Marco & Wilson, Granville Tunnicliffe, 2009. "Constructing structural VAR models with conditional independence graphs," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 79(9), pages 2910-2916.
    6. Heckman, James & Pinto, Rodrigo, 2015. "Causal Analysis After Haavelmo," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(01), pages 115-151, February.
    7. Alessio Moneta, 2008. "Graphical causal models and VARs: an empirical assessment of the real business cycles hypothesis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 275-300, September.
    8. Geng, Zhi & Wang, Chi & Zhao, Qiang, 2005. "Decomposition of search for v-structures in DAGs," Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 282-294, October.
    9. Tyler J. VanderWeele & James M. Robins, 2010. "Signed directed acyclic graphs for causal inference," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 72(1), pages 111-127.
    10. Zijun Wang, 2010. "Directed graphs, information structure and forecast combinations: an empirical examination of US unemployment rates," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(4), pages 353-366.
    11. Karim Chalak & Halbert White, 2008. "Causality, Conditional Independence, and Graphical Separation in Settable Systems," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 689, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 04 Jul 2010.
    12. Jonas Peters & Peter Bühlmann & Nicolai Meinshausen, 2016. "Causal inference by using invariant prediction: identification and confidence intervals," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 78(5), pages 947-1012, November.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jorssb:v:64:y:2002:i:3:p:321-348. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rssssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.