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Market Sidedness: Insights into Motives for Trade Initiation

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  • ASANI SARKAR
  • ROBERT A. SCHWARTZ

Abstract

We infer motives for trade initiation from market sidedness. We define trading as more two-sided (one-sided) if the correlation between the number of buyer- and seller-initiated trades increases (decreases), and assess changes in sidedness (relative to a control sample) around events that identify trade initiators. Consistent with asymmetric information, trading is more one-sided before merger news. Consistent with belief heterogeneity, trading is more two-sided before earnings and macro announcements with greater dispersion in analyst forecasts, and after news with larger announcement surprises. We examine the codeterminacy of sidedness, bid-ask spread, volatility, number of trades, and order imbalance. Copyright (c) 2009 The American Finance Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Asani Sarkar & Robert A. Schwartz, 2009. "Market Sidedness: Insights into Motives for Trade Initiation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(1), pages 375-423, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfinan:v:64:y:2009:i:1:p:375-423
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ingrid Lo & Stephen Sapp, 2011. "Belief Dispersion and Order Submission Strategies in the Foreign Exchange Market," Staff Working Papers 11-8, Bank of Canada.
    2. Fleming, Michael J. & Nguyen, Giang, 2013. "Price and size discovery in financial markets: evidence from the U.S. Treasury securities market," Staff Reports 624, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Aug 2018.
    3. Opschoor, Anne & Taylor, Nick & van der Wel, Michel & van Dijk, Dick, 2014. "Order flow and volatility: An empirical investigation," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 185-201.
    4. Chunmei Lin & Massimo Massa & Hong Zhang, 2014. "Mutual Funds and Information Diffusion: The Role of Country-Level Governance," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-079/IV/DSF76, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Bianchi, Milo & Jehiel, Philippe, 2015. "Financial reporting and market efficiency with extrapolative investors," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 842-878.
    6. Chakraborty, Archishman & Pagano, Michael S. & Schwartz, Robert A., 2012. "Order revelation at market openings," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 127-150.
    7. Sheridan Titman & Daisuke Miyakawa & Shuji Watanabe, 2014. "What Determines CDS Prices? Evidence from the Estimation of Protection Demand and Supply," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 1-28, March.
    8. repec:eee:jfinec:v:125:y:2017:i:3:p:561-588 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Johannes A. Skjeltorp & Elvira Sojli & Wing Wah Tham, 2012. "Identifying cross-sided liquidity externalities," Working Paper 2012/20, Norges Bank.
    10. repec:eee:intfin:v:51:y:2017:i:c:p:171-189 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Menkveld, Albert J. & Yueshen, Bart Zhou & Zhu, Haoxiang, 2017. "Shades of darkness: A pecking order of trading venues," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(3), pages 503-534.
    12. Jain, Pawan & Jiang, Christine & Mekhaimer, Mohamed, 2016. "Executives' horizon, internal governance and stock market liquidity," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-23.
    13. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-17-00384 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Smales, Lee A. & Yang, Yi, 2015. "The importance of belief dispersion in the response of gold futures to macroeconomic announcements," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 292-302.
    15. Smales, Lee A., 2016. "Order aggressiveness of different broker-types in response to monetary policy news," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 40(PB), pages 367-383.
    16. Choy, Siu Kai & Wei, Jason, 2012. "Option trading: Information or differences of opinion?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 2299-2322.
    17. Foley, Sean & Putniņš, Tālis J., 2016. "Should we be afraid of the dark? Dark trading and market quality," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(3), pages 456-481.

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