IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Middlemen and Oligopolistic Market Makers


  • Jiandong Ju
  • Scott C. Linn
  • Zhen Zhu


"This paper studies the endogenous structure of intermediation when heterogeneous intermediaries choose between becoming a middleman or a market maker, and the relation between the equilibrium market structure and price dispersion. We obtain three main results: First, middlemen and oligopolistic market makers can coexist in the market equilibrium. All market makers publicly post unique ask and bid prices. These prices serve as the high and low bounds, respectively, for the ask and bid prices of middlemen, when capacity cost is sufficiently large. Second, more efficient intermediaries choose to become market makers, whereas less efficient intermediaries choose to become middlemen. Third, if the fixed cost of capacity installation for market makers increases, the number of market makers declines, whereas the number of middlemen increases. As a result, both ask prices and bid prices become more dispersed." Copyright (c) 2010, The Author(s) Journal Compilation (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..

Suggested Citation

  • Jiandong Ju & Scott C. Linn & Zhen Zhu, 2010. "Middlemen and Oligopolistic Market Makers," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 1-23, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jemstr:v:19:y:2010:i:1:p:1-23

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Chun Pang & He-ling Shi, 2010. "On the Emergence and Evolution of Mark-up Middlemen: An Inframarginal Model," Monash Economics Working Papers 24-10, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. Michael R. Baye & J. Rupert J. Gatti & Paul Kattuman & John Morgan, 2009. "Clicks, Discontinuities, and Firm Demand Online," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(4), pages 935-975, December.
    3. Fernando, Chitru S. & Herring, Richard J. & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 2008. "Common liquidity shocks and market collapse: Lessons from the market for perps," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1625-1635, August.
    4. Murry, Donald & Zhu, Zhen, 2008. "Asymmetric price responses, market integration and market power: A study of the U.S. natural gas market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 748-765, May.
    5. Maria Eugenia Sanin, 2016. "Tradable emission permits: beyond pollution abatement motives," Documents de recherche 16-01, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jemstr:v:19:y:2010:i:1:p:1-23. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.