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Do the BRICs and Emerging Markets Differ in their Agrifood Imports?


  • Zahoor Haq
  • Karl Meilke


This study develops an import demand model to explore the role of income in explaining the trade performance of low-, middle- and high-income countries with a special emphasis on Brazil, Russia, India and China - the BRIC economies. The study estimates the impact of the growth in per capita income on the trade of agrifood products using data from 52 countries and 20 agrifood products for the years 1990-2006. The results suggest that China, Russia and Brazil now have more income elastic import demands than other middle-income countries. Conversely, the income elasticities of import demand in India are similar to other low-income countries and for the most part statistically equal to zero. Copyright (c) 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2010 The Agricultural Economics Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Zahoor Haq & Karl Meilke, 2010. "Do the BRICs and Emerging Markets Differ in their Agrifood Imports?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(1), pages 1-14.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:61:y:2010:i:1:p:1-14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John Cranfield & Paul Preckel & James Eales & Thomas Hertel, 2000. "On the estimation of 'an implicitly additive demand system'," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(15), pages 1907-1915.
    2. Peter Egger, 2002. "An Econometric View on the Estimation of Gravity Models and the Calculation of Trade Potentials," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(2), pages 297-312, February.
    3. Hallak, Juan Carlos, 2006. "Product quality and the direction of trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 238-265, January.
    4. Cranfield, J. A. L. & Preckel, Paul V. & Eales, James S. & Hertel, Thomas W., 2002. "Estimating consumer demands across the development spectrum: maximum likelihood estimates of an implicit direct additivity model," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 289-307, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bojnec, Štefan & Fertő, Imre & Fogarasi, József, 2011. "Patterns and determinants of agro-food trade of the BRIC countries: The role of institution," IAMO Forum 2011: Will the "BRICs Decade" Continue? – Prospects for Trade and Growth 19, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe (IAMO).
    2. KARGI, Bilal, 2014. "The Effects of BRICS and MATIK Countries on World Economy and Cointegration Analysis The Long Term Relation G-7 Growth Rates (1962-2012)," MPRA Paper 55693, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Cairns, Alexander P. & Meilke, Karl D., 2012. "The Next-11 and the BRICs: Are They the Future Markets for Agrifood Trade?," Trade Policy Briefs 145971, Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network.
    4. Orden, David, 2013. "The Changing Structure of Domestic Support and Its Implications for Trade," Commissioned Papers 146657, Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network.
    5. Kargi, Bilal, 2014. "Structural Breakage and Long-term Cointegration Analysis for Economic Growth in G-7, BRICS and MATIK Countries," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 431-442.
    6. KARGI, Bilal, 2014. "Structural Breakage and Long Term Cointegration Analysis for Economic Growth in G-7, BRICS and MATIK Countries (1962-2012)," MPRA Paper 57106, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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