IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/intfin/v21y2018i1p39-54.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Resolution of international banks: Can smaller countries cope?

Author

Listed:
  • Dirk Schoenmaker

Abstract

The stability of a banking system ultimately depends on the strength and credibility of the fiscal backstop. While large countries can still afford to resolve large global banks on their own, small and medium†sized countries face a policy choice. This paper investigates the impact of resolution on banking structure. The financial trilemma model suggests that smaller countries can either conduct joint supervision and resolution of their global banks (based on single point of entry resolution) or reduce the size of their global banks and move to separate resolution of these banks' national subsidiaries (based on multiple point of entry resolution). Euro†area countries are heading for joint resolution based on burden sharing, while the United Kingdom and Switzerland have implemented policies to downsize their banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Dirk Schoenmaker, 2018. "Resolution of international banks: Can smaller countries cope?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 39-54, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:intfin:v:21:y:2018:i:1:p:39-54
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/infi.12123
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anginer, Deniz & Cerutti, Eugenio & Martínez Pería, María Soledad, 2017. "Foreign bank subsidiaries' default risk during the global crisis: What factors help insulate affiliates from their parents?," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 19-31.
    2. Dewatripont, Mathias, 2014. "European banking: Bailout, bail-in and state aid control," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 37-43.
    3. Gandhi, Priyank & Lustig, Hanno & Plazzi, Alberto, 2016. "Equity Is Cheap for Large Financial Institutions: The International Evidence," Research Papers 3454, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    4. Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli & Huizinga, Harry, 2013. "Are banks too big to fail or too big to save? International evidence from equity prices and CDS spreads," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 875-894.
    5. Charles Goodhart & Dirk Schoenmaker, 2009. "Fiscal Burden Sharing in Cross-Border Banking Crises," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 5(1), pages 141-165, March.
    6. Pia Hüttl & Dirk Schoenmaker, 2016. "Fiscal capacity to support large banks," Policy Contributions 16765, Bruegel.
    7. Pauly, Louis W., 2014. "Governing global risks: The evolution of policy capacity in the financial sector," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Global Governance SP IV 2014-103, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    8. Schoenmaker, Dirk, 2013. "Governance of International Banking: The Financial Trilemma," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199971596.
    9. Goodhart, Charles & Schoenmaker, Dirk, 2016. "The global investment banks are now all becoming American: does that matter for Europeans?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67593, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Luc Laeven & Fabián Valencia, 2013. "Systemic Banking Crises Database," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 61(2), pages 225-270, June.
    11. Daniel Gros & Dirk Schoenmaker, 2014. "European Deposit Insurance and Resolution in the Banking Union," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 529-546, May.
    12. Yuliya Makarova & Anna Ilyina & Christian Schmieder & Eugenio M Cerutti, 2010. "Bankers Without Borders? Implications of Ring-Fencing for European Cross-Border Banks," IMF Working Papers 10/247, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. E Pluribus Unum: single vs. multiple point of entry resolution
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2018-12-03 13:22:14

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Beck, Thorsten & Da-Rocha-Lopes, Samuel & Silva, Andre, 2017. "Sharing the Pain? Credit Supply and Real Effects of Bank Bail-ins," CEPR Discussion Papers 12058, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:intfin:v:21:y:2018:i:1:p:39-54. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1367-0271 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.