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China'S Corporatization Drive: An Evaluation And Policy Implications




"This paper evaluates China's corporatization drive based on an assessment of the state sector's current problems. It shows that the worsening agency problem and excessive welfare burdens, as well as increasing competition, have contributed to the increasing losses experienced by Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs). While socialization of welfare burdens may improve SOEs' financial health, the mass corporatization drive by itself without institutional underpinnings, is unlikely to solve the more fundamental agency problem. The paper then argues that the key to a successful restructuring of the state sector lies in the fundamental transformation of state ownership and the creation of effective governance mechanisms, which, in turn, requires the development of the country's market-oriented institutions, in particular, financial markets and the rule of law." ("JEL" P20, P31) Copyright 1999 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Tian Zhu, 1999. "China'S Corporatization Drive: An Evaluation And Policy Implications," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 17(4), pages 530-539, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:17:y:1999:i:4:p:530-539

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Yuanzheng Cao & Yingyi Qian & Barry R. Weingast, 1999. "From federalism, Chinese style to privatization, Chinese style," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(1), pages 103-131, March.
    2. Fama, Eugene F & Jensen, Michael C, 1983. "Separation of Ownership and Control," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 301-325, June.
    3. Hart, Oliver, 1995. "Corporate Governance: Some Theory and Implications," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(430), pages 678-689, May.
    4. Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1997. " A Survey of Corporate Governance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(2), pages 737-783, June.
    5. repec:hrv:faseco:30728046 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Yingyi Qian, 1996. "Enterprise reform in China: agency problems and political control," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 4(2), pages 427-447, October.
    7. Gary H. Jefferson & Thomas G. Rawski, 1994. "Enterprise Reform in Chinese Industry," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 47-70, Spring.
    8. Rumen Dobrinsky, 1996. "Enterprise restructuring and adjustment in the transition to market economy: lessons from the experience of Central and Eastern Europe," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 4(2), pages 389-410, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sun, Qunyan & Zhang, Anming & Li, Jie, 2005. "A study of optimal state shares in mixed oligopoly: Implications for SOE reform and foreign competition," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 1-27.
    2. Cull, Robert & Li, Wei & Sun, Bo & Xu, Lixin Colin, 2015. "Government connections and financial constraints: Evidence from a large representative sample of Chinese firms," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 271-294.
    3. Goering, Gregory E. & Sarangi, Sudipta, 2012. "Durable goods produced by state owned enterprises," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 893-899.
    4. Jia Liu & Dong Pang, 2009. "Financial factors and company investment decisions in transitional China," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(2), pages 91-108.
    5. O'Connor, Neale G. & Chow, Chee W. & Wu, Anne, 2004. "The adoption of "Western" management accounting/controls in China's state-owned enterprises during economic transition," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 29(3-4), pages 349-375.
    6. Xia, Jun & Li, Shaomin & Long, Cheryl, 2009. "The Transformation of Collectively Owned Enterprises and its Outcomes in China, 2001-05," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1651-1662, October.
    7. Li, Shaomin & Xia, Jun, 2008. "The Roles and Performance of State Firms and Non-State Firms in China's Economic Transition," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 39-54, January.
    8. Liu Wang & William Judge, 2012. "Managerial ownership and the role of privatization in transition economies: The case of China," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 479-498, June.
    9. Motohashi, Kazuyuki, 2008. "IT, enterprise reform, and productivity in Chinese manufacturing firms," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 325-333, August.
    10. Cull, Robert & Xu, Lixin Colin, 2005. "Institutions, ownership, and finance: the determinants of profit reinvestment among Chinese firms," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 117-146, July.
    11. Zhang, Anming & Zhang, Yimin & Zhao, Ronald, 2002. "Profitability and productivity of Chinese industrial firms: Measurement and ownership implications," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 65-88.
    12. Zhang, Anming & Zhang, Yimin & Zhao, Ronald, 2003. "A study of the R&D efficiency and productivity of Chinese firms," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 444-464, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General
    • P31 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Socialist Enterprises and Their Transitions


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