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Economic Resources Of The Homeless: Evidence From Los Angeles

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  • ROBERT F. SCHOENI
  • PAUL KOEGEL

Abstract

This paper examines the economic resources of homeless adults using a unique data set from Los Angeles. The homeless rely on a variety of sources for income; the two most common sources are the government and the family. Over 58% received government transfers in the 30 days prior to the interview, while one-third had received cash assistance from a family member or friend. Familial transfers in the form of shared housing and meals also are important. While familial transfers buffer declines in income among the homeless, private support networks are not pervasive enough to overcome the severe difficulties the homeless face. Moreover, it is unclear why such a high share of the homeless do not participate in government assistance programs, although the evidence suggests that transaction costs are likely to be an important factor. Copyright 1998 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert F. Schoeni & Paul Koegel, 1998. "Economic Resources Of The Homeless: Evidence From Los Angeles," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(3), pages 295-308, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:16:y:1998:i:3:p:295-308
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1465-7287.1998.tb00520.x
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    1. Milton H. Marquis & Tor Einarsson, 1994. "Optimal disinflation paths when growth is endogenous," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 94-32, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Quah, Danny & Vahey, Shaun P, 1995. "Measuring Core Inflation?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(432), pages 1130-1144, September.
    3. David Mayes & Bryan Chapple, 1995. "The costs and benefits of disinflation: a critique of the sacrifice ration," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 58, March.
    4. Jon Faust & Eric M. Leeper, 1994. "When do long-run identifying restrictions give reliable results?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 94-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    5. Faust, Jon & Leeper, Eric M, 1997. "When Do Long-Run Identifying Restrictions Give Reliable Results?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(3), pages 345-353, July.
    6. Andreas Fischer, 1996. "Central bank independence and sacrifice ratios," Open Economies Review, Springer, pages 5-18.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gundersen, Craig & Weinreb, Linda & Wehler, Cheryl & Hosmer, David, 2003. "Homelessness and food insecurity," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, pages 250-272.
    2. Keiichiro Kobayashi & Noriyuki Yanagawa, 2007. "Bank distress and the borrowers' productivity," CARF F-Series CARF-F-111, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
    3. Sylvain Chareyron, 2015. "Take-up of social assistance benefits: The case of homeless Take-up of Social Assistance Benefits: The Case of Homeless," Working Papers hal-01292107, HAL.

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