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Chamberlin Meets Ciriacy-Wantrup: Using Insights from Experimental Economics to Inform Stated Preference Research

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  • Christian A. Vossler

Abstract

type="main" xml:lang="pt"> De nombreuses études dans lesquelles des enquêtes de préférences déclarées sont utilisées pour estimer la demande de biens publics ou privés peuvent être qualifiées d'expérimentales, bien que ce ne soit pas automatiquement le cas. Le présent article examine la vaste littérature sur l’économie expérimentale afin d'offrir aux concepteurs d'enquêtes de préférences déclarées et aux chercheurs des connaissances supplémentaires sur divers sujets tels que l’élaboration d'une enquête, la conception des mécanismes, la validité externe, l'analyse des données et la diffusion des résultats.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian A. Vossler, 2016. "Chamberlin Meets Ciriacy-Wantrup: Using Insights from Experimental Economics to Inform Stated Preference Research," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 64(1), pages 33-48, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:canjag:v:64:y:2016:i:1:p:33-48
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/cjag.12099
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert J. Johnston & Kevin J. Boyle & Wiktor (Vic) Adamowicz & Jeff Bennett & Roy Brouwer & Trudy Ann Cameron & W. Michael Hanemann & Nick Hanley & Mandy Ryan & Riccardo Scarpa & Roger Tourangeau & Ch, 2017. "Contemporary Guidance for Stated Preference Studies," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(2), pages 319-405.
    2. Chavez, Daniel E. & Palma, Marco A. & Nayga Jr., Rodolfo M., 2017. "When does real become consequential in non-hypothetical choice experiments?," 2018 Annual Meeting, February 2-6, 2018, Jacksonville, Florida 266327, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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