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Listen to Me, Learn with Me: International Migration and Knowledge Transfer

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  • Allan M. Williams

Abstract

Existing research on the economic contribution of individual international labour migrants has been couched largely in terms of skills, and has focused on mobility within transnational corporations. This article explores some of the broader links between the literatures on international migration and management, and addresses four main questions: is migrant knowledge selective, is it distinctive, what are the barriers to migrant knowledge transfer and what are the implications for individual migrants and firms. This largely conceptual review is informed by three main premises: the value of adopting a knowledge as opposed to a skills perspective on migration; the importance of examining the cycle of migration rather than static snapshots at particular stages, and the need to consider inter‐firm and extra‐firm migration, as well as intra‐firm mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Allan M. Williams, 2007. "Listen to Me, Learn with Me: International Migration and Knowledge Transfer," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(2), pages 361-382, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:45:y:2007:i:2:p:361-382
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8543.2007.00618.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brown, Phillip & Green, Andy & Lauder, Hugh, 2001. "High Skills: Globalization, Competitiveness, and Skill Formation," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199244201.
    2. Regets, Mark, 2001. "Research and Policy Issues in High-Skilled International Migration: A Perspective with Data from the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 366, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Alireza Naghavi & Chiara Strozzi, 2017. "Intellectual property rights and diaspora knowledge networks: Can patent protection generate brain gain from skilled migration?," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 50(4), pages 995-1022, November.
    2. Alireza Naghavi & Chiara Strozzi, 2011. "Intellectual Property Rights, Migration, and Diaspora," Working Papers 2011.60, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    3. Ilse van Liempt & Gery Nijenhuis, 2020. "Socio-Economic Participation of Somali Refugees in the Netherlands, Transnational Networks and Boundary Spanning," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 8(1), pages 264-274.
    4. Alireza Naghavi & Chiara Strozzi, "undated". "Intellectual Property Rights and Diaspora Knowledge Networks," Development Working Papers 380, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    5. Williams, Allan M. & Baláz, Vladimir, 2008. "International return mobility, learning and knowledge transfer: A case study of Slovak doctors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(11), pages 1924-1933, December.
    6. Brixy, Udo & Brunow, Stephan & D'Ambrosio, Anna, 2017. "Ethnic diversity in start-ups and its impact on innovation," IAB-Discussion Paper 201725, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    7. Helena Barnard & David Deeds & Ram Mudambi & Paul M. Vaaler, 2019. "Migrants, migration policies, and international business research: Current trends and new directions," Journal of International Business Policy, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 2(4), pages 275-288, December.
    8. Naghavi, Alireza & Strozzi, Chiara, 2015. "Intellectual property rights, diasporas, and domestic innovation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 150-161.
    9. Chengguang Li & Rodrigo Isidor & Luis Alfonso Dau & Rudy Kabst, 2018. "The More the Merrier? Immigrant Share and Entrepreneurial Activities," Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, , vol. 42(5), pages 698-733, September.
    10. Mario Davide Parrilli, 2010. "Heterogeneous Social Capitals: A New Window of Opportunity for Local Economies," Working Papers 2010R06, Orkestra - Basque Institute of Competitiveness.
    11. Alireza Naghavi & Chiara Strozzi, "undated". "Can Intellectual Property Rights Protection Generate Brain Gain from International Migration?," Development Working Papers 374, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    12. Colombelli, Alessandra & D'Ambrosio, Anna & Meliciani, Valentina & Francesco Quatraro,, 2016. "Explaining the industrial variety of newborn firms: The role of cultural and technological diversity," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis LEI & BRICK - Laboratory of Economics of Innovation "Franco Momigliano", Bureau of Research in Innovation, Complexity and Knowledge, Collegio 201606, University of Turin.

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