IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bit/bsrysr/v5y2014i2p46-60.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Two Effects of the European Financial Crisis

Author

Listed:
  • Saucedo Acosta Edgar J.
  • Rullán Rosanis Samantha

    (Institute of Economic and Social Studies, University of Veracruz, Mexico)

Abstract

Background: The European financial crisis has affected most of the EU member states, and European institutions have had to create new financial instruments to counter the impact. Most effects in the economic and political spheres can be attributed to high unemployment and changes in governments in peripheral countries (Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Spain and Romania). Objectives: The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the economic and political effects of the European financial crisis in some peripheral countries that have implemented austerity policies. Methods/Approach: The methodology used is mixed: an analysis of the primary economic variables of the selected countries in comparison to those of countries with low-risk premium was performed, and the relation between the bailouts and elections was presented. Results: The exacerbation of the crisis in the Eurozone is mainly due to the high political costs of austerity measures and not the high level of public spending and/or the alternations in the governments of peripheral countries. Conclusions: The European financial crisis is primarily a result of weak economic governance, and its effects are differentiated. The peripheral countries possess the highest rates of unemployment, and there is a higher tendency towards political instability in rescued countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Saucedo Acosta Edgar J. & Rullán Rosanis Samantha, 2014. "Two Effects of the European Financial Crisis," Business Systems Research, Sciendo, vol. 5(2), pages 46-60, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bit:bsrysr:v:5:y:2014:i:2:p:46-60
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bsrj.2041.5.issue-2/bsrj-2014-0009/bsrj-2014-0009.xml?format=INT
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fidrmuc, Jarko & Korhonen, Iikka, 2003. "Similarity of supply and demand shocks between the euro area and the CEECs," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 313-334, September.
    2. Paul DE GRAUWE & Hilde Heens, 1993. "Real Exchange Rate Variability in Monetary Unions," Discussion Papers (REL - Recherches Economiques de Louvain) 1993015, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    3. De Grauwe, Paul & Ji, Yuemei, 2013. "Self-fulfilling crises in the Eurozone: An empirical test," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 15-36.
    4. Lorenzo E Bernal-Verdugo & Davide Furceri & Dominique Guillaume, 2012. "Labor Market Flexibility and Unemployment: New Empirical Evidence of Static and Dynamic Effects," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 54(2), pages 251-273, June.
    5. Dabrowski, Marek, 2010. "The global financial crisis: Lessons for European integration," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 38-54, March.
    6. Bordo, Michael D. & Meissner, Christopher M. & Stuckler, David, 2010. "Foreign currency debt, financial crises and economic growth: A long-run view," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 642-665, June.
    7. Philip R. Lane, 2012. "The European Sovereign Debt Crisis," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(3), pages 49-68, Summer.
    8. Kevin Featherstone, 2011. "The JCMS Annual Lecture: The Greek Sovereign Debt Crisis and EMU: A Failing State in a Skewed Regime," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(2), pages 193-217, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial crisis; governance; bailouts; European institutions; peripheral countries;

    JEL classification:

    • E00 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - General
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bit:bsrysr:v:5:y:2014:i:2:p:46-60. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: https://www.sciendo.com/services/journals .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.