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Understanding Differences Between Financial Distress and Bankruptcy

Author

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  • Platt, Harlan D.
  • Platt, Marjorie B.

Abstract

For the most part, research purporting to address the issue of financial distress has actually studied samples of bankrupt companies. Financial distress and bankruptcy are different. In contrast, this paper starts with a sample of companies that are financially distressed but not yet bankrupt. The sample was obtained by screening the Compustat industry database with a three-tiered identification system. The screen bifurcated companies into financially and non-financially distressed groups. A multi-tiered screen reduces the incidence of mistakenly identifying a non-distressed company as financially distressed. The paper then compares factors indicating the likelihood of future bankruptcies to those indicating future financial distress. To do this, an early warning financial-distress model was developed and compared to a methodologically similar existent model of bankruptcy. The final financial distress model included only one variable present in the bankruptcy model and four new variables. The limited overlap of explanatory factors between the models questions the similarity of financial distress and bankruptcy. Statistical tests lend support to the notion that the bankruptcy process is not just a continuation of a downward spiraling cycle of financial distress. Our hypothesis is that financial distress is something that happens to companies as a consequence of operating decisions or external forces while bankruptcy is something that companies choose to do to protect their assets from creditors.

Suggested Citation

  • Platt, Harlan D. & Platt, Marjorie B., 2006. "Understanding Differences Between Financial Distress and Bankruptcy," Review of Applied Economics, Review of Applied Economics, vol. 2(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:reapec:50146
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/50146
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:bla:joares:v:15:y:1977:i::p:1-53 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Gilson, Stuart C., 1989. "Management turnover and financial distress," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 241-262, December.
    3. Gilson, Stuart C. & John, Kose & Lang, Larry H. P., 1990. "Troubled debt restructurings*1: An empirical study of private reorganization of firms in default," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 315-353, October.
    4. Frydman, Halina & Altman, Edward I & Kao, Duen-Li, 1985. " Introducing Recursive Partitioning for Financial Classification: The Case of Financial Distress," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 40(1), pages 269-291, March.
    5. Altman, Edward I. & Marco, Giancarlo & Varetto, Franco, 1994. "Corporate distress diagnosis: Comparisons using linear discriminant analysis and neural networks (the Italian experience)," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 505-529, May.
    6. John, Kose & Lang, Larry H P & Netter, Jeffry, 1992. " The Voluntary Restructuring of Large Firms in Response to Performance Decline," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(3), pages 891-917, July.
    7. Lo, Andrew W., 1986. "Logit versus discriminant analysis : A specification test and application to corporate bankruptcies," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 151-178, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantaras, Konstantinos & Siriopoulos, Costas, 2011. "Estimating financial distress with a dynamic model: Evidence from family owned enterprises in a small open economy," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 239-255, October.
    2. Lu, Yang-Cheng & Shen, Chung-Hua & Wei, Yu-Chen, 2013. "Revisiting early warning signals of corporate credit default using linguistic analysis," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 1-21.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial distress; early warning model; renewal; Financial Economics; G30; G33;

    JEL classification:

    • G30 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - General
    • G33 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Bankruptcy; Liquidation

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