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Crop diversification decisions: the case of vanilla in Uganda

Listed author(s):
  • Komarek, Adam M.
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    This article provides a micro-level foundation for the analysis of crop diversification decisions in a semi-subsistence banana farming community in Uganda. A two-crop agricultural household model is developed to show that credit rationing and crop price movements influence vanilla adoption decisions. The analysis is based on survey data from 70 households. Household welfare improves by 16%, without raising food security concerns, when vanilla is grown. Results imply that the benefits of functioning credit markets, and crop quality improvement strategies that lift farm-gate vanilla prices, are important to consider when developing pro-poor growth strategies at the farm level.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/155551
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    Article provided by Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin in its journal Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture.

    Volume (Year): 49 (No.3)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:qjiage:155551
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    1. Holden, Stein T. & Taylor, J. Edward & Hampton, Stephen, 1999. "Structural adjustment and market imperfections: a stylized village economy-wide model with non-separable farm households," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(01), pages 69-87, February.
    2. Govereh, Jones & Jayne, T. S., 2003. "Cash cropping and food crop productivity: synergies or trade-offs?," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 39-50, January.
    3. Shenggen Fan & Xiaobo Zhang, 2008. "Public Expenditure, Growth and Poverty Reduction in Rural Uganda," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 20(3), pages 466-496.
    4. von Braun, Joachim, 1995. "Agricultural commercialization: impacts on income and nutrition and implications for policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 187-202, June.
    5. Catherine Guirkinger & Stephen R. Boucher, 2008. "Credit constraints and productivity in Peruvian agriculture," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(3), pages 295-308, November.
    6. Craig McIntosh, 2008. "Estimating Treatment Effects from Spatial Policy Experiments: An Application to Ugandan Microfinance," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 15-28, February.
    7. Coelli, Tim & Fleming, Euan, 2004. "Diversification economies and specialisation efficiencies in a mixed food and coffee smallholder farming system in Papua New Guinea," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(2-3), pages 229-239, December.
    8. Pingali, Prabhu L. & Rosegrant, Mark W., 1995. "Agricultural commercialization and diversification: processes and policies," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 171-185, June.
    9. Holden, Stein & Shiferaw, Bekele & Pender, John, 2005. "Policy analysis for sustainable land management and food security in Ethiopia: a bioeconomic model with market imperfections," Research reports 140, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Foltz, Jeremy D., 2004. "Credit market access and profitability in Tunisian agriculture," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 229-240, May.
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