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The Income Distribution Effect of Natural Disasters: An Analysis of Hurricane Katrina

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  • Shaughnessy, Timothy M.
  • White, Mary L.
  • Brendler, Michael D.

Abstract

This paper combines the study of income distribution with that of natural disasters. We introduce several income density functions to approximate the income distributions of five samples: New Orleans prior to Katrina, New Orleans after Katrina, the United States during the same year (2005), and then New Orleans and the United States in 2007. We then assess the goodness of fit of these models to determine which most accurately represents the income dis-tributions of the samples. We conclude with a discussion of how the income inequality and distribution was impacted in the city of New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina using the best-fitting models and examine the persistence of these changes two years later.

Suggested Citation

  • Shaughnessy, Timothy M. & White, Mary L. & Brendler, Michael D., 2010. "The Income Distribution Effect of Natural Disasters: An Analysis of Hurricane Katrina," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132443
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/132443
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "The Death Toll from Natural Disasters: The Role of Income, Geography, and Institutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 271-284, May.
    2. Janice F. Madden, 2000. "Changes in Income Inequality within U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number cii, November.
    3. Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2003. "Economic Crises and Natural Disasters: Coping Strategies and Policy Implications," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1087-1102, July.
    4. Albala-Bertrand, J. M., 1993. "Natural disaster situations and growth: A macroeconomic model for sudden disaster impacts," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(9), pages 1417-1434, September.
    5. Mark Skidmore & Hideki Toya, 2002. "Do Natural Disasters Promote Long-Run Growth?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(4), pages 664-687, October.
    6. Paulo Guimaraes & Frank L. Hefner & Douglas P. Woodward, 1993. "Wealth And Income Effects Of Natural Disasters: An Econometric Analysis Of Hurricane Hugo," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 23(2), pages 97-114, Fall.
    7. Craig E. Landry & Okmyung Bin & Paul Hindsley & John C. Whitehead & Kenneth Wilson, 2007. "Going Home: Evacuation-Migration Decisions of Hurrican Katrina Survivors," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 326-343, October.
    8. Robert A. Baade & Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2007. "Estimating the Economic Impact of Natural and Social Disasters, with an Application to Hurricane Katrina," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 44(11), pages 2061-2076, October.
    9. Stanley Smith & Christopher McCarty, 1996. "Demographic effects of natural disasters: a case study of hurricane andrew," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(2), pages 265-275, May.
    10. Campano, Fred & Salvatore, Dominick, 2006. "Income Distribution," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195300918.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:regeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:12-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Daniel Felsenstein & Michal Lichter, 2014. "Social and economic vulnerability of coastal communities to sea-level rise and extreme flooding," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 71(1), pages 463-491, March.

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