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Social and economic vulnerability of coastal communities to sea-level rise and extreme flooding

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  • Daniel Felsenstein
  • Michal Lichter

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Abstract

This paper assesses the socioeconomic consequences of extreme coastal flooding events. Wealth and income impacts associated with different social groups in coastal communities in Israel are estimated. A range of coastal flood hazard zones based on different scenarios are identified. These are superimposed on a composite social vulnerability index to highlight the spatial variation in the socioeconomic structure of those areas exposed to flooding. Economic vulnerability is captured by the exposure of wealth and income. For the former, we correlate the distribution of housing stock at risk with the socioeconomic characteristics of threatened populations. We also estimate the value of residential assets exposed under the different scenarios. For the latter, we calculate the observed change in income distribution of the population under threat of inundation. We interpret the change in income distribution as an indicator of recovery potential. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Felsenstein & Michal Lichter, 2014. "Social and economic vulnerability of coastal communities to sea-level rise and extreme flooding," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 71(1), pages 463-491, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:71:y:2014:i:1:p:463-491 DOI: 10.1007/s11069-013-0929-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Iuliana Armas & Radu Ionescu & Cristina Posner, 2015. "Flood risk perception along the Lower Danube river, Romania," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 79(3), pages 1913-1931, December.
    2. Stephanie Chang & Jackie Yip & Shona Zijll de Jong & Rebecca Chaster & Ashley Lowcock, 2015. "Using vulnerability indicators to develop resilience networks: a similarity approach," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 78(3), pages 1827-1841, September.
    3. Konstantinos Karagiorgos & Thomas Thaler & Johannes Hübl & Fotios Maris & Sven Fuchs, 2016. "Multi-vulnerability analysis for flash flood risk management," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 82(1), pages 63-87, May.

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