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Demographic effects of natural disasters: a case study of hurricane andrew

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  • Stanley Smith

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  • Christopher McCarty

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Stanley Smith & Christopher McCarty, 1996. "Demographic effects of natural disasters: a case study of hurricane andrew," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(2), pages 265-275, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:33:y:1996:i:2:p:265-275
    DOI: 10.2307/2061876
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Narayan Sastry, 2007. "Tracing the Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Population of New Orleans The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study," Working Papers 483, RAND Corporation.
    2. Matthew A. COLE & Robert J R ELLIOTT & OKUBO Toshihiro & Eric STROBL, 2013. "Natural Disasters and Plant Survival: The impact of the Kobe earthquake," Discussion papers 13063, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Jenna Nobles & Elizabeth Frankenberg & Duncan Thomas, 2014. "The Effects of Mortality on Fertility: Population Dynamics after a Natural Disaster," NBER Working Papers 20448, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Matthew A. COLE & Robert J R ELLIOTT & OKUBO Toshihiro & Eric STROBL, 2015. "Natural Disasters, Industrial Clusters and Manufacturing Plant Survival," Discussion papers 15008, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    5. Narayan Sastry, 2007. "Tracing the Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Population of New Orleans The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study," Working Papers WR-483, RAND Corporation.
    6. David G. Lenze, 1997. "Dynamic and Spatial Impact of Hurricane Andrew on Florida'S Taxable Sales: An Intervention Analysis," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 27(2), pages 163-183, Fall.
    7. Narayan Sastry & Jesse Gregory, 2014. "The Location of Displaced New Orleans Residents in the Year After Hurricane Katrina," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(3), pages 753-775, June.
    8. David A. Swanson & Jeff Tayman, 2011. "On Estimating a De Facto Population and Its Components," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 1, pages 17-31, November.
    9. James R. Elliott & Jeremy Pais, 2010. "When Nature Pushes Back: Environmental Impact and the Spatial Redistribution of Socially Vulnerable Populations," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(s1), pages 1187-1202.
    10. Clark Gray & Richard Bilsborrow, 2013. "Environmental Influences on Human Migration in Rural Ecuador," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(4), pages 1217-1241, August.
    11. R. Collenteur & H. Moel & B. Jongman & G. Di Baldassarre, 2015. "The failed-levee effect: Do societies learn from flood disasters?," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 76(1), pages 373-388, March.
    12. Gassebner, Martin & Keck, Alexander & Teh, Robert, 2006. "The impact of disasters on international trade," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2006-04, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    13. Robert Baade & Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2005. "Predicting the Path to Recovery from Hurricane Katrina through the Lens of Hurricane Andrew and the Rodney King Riots," Working Papers 0515, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    14. Ariel R. Belasen & Solomon W. Polachek, 2013. "Natural disasters and migration," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 17, pages 309-330 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Matthew A. Cole & Robert J R Elliott & Toshihiro Okubo & Eric Strobl, 2014. "Natural Disasters and the Birth, Life and Death of Plants: The Case of the Kobe Earthquake," Working Papers 2014-114, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    16. Shaughnessy, Timothy M. & White, Mary L. & Brendler, Michael D., 2010. "The Income Distribution Effect of Natural Disasters: An Analysis of Hurricane Katrina," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1).
    17. Ann-Margaret Esnard & Alka Sapat & Diana Mitsova, 2011. "An index of relative displacement risk to hurricanes," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 59(2), pages 833-859, November.
    18. Leah Platt Boustan & Matthew E. Kahn & Paul W. Rhode & Maria Lucia Yanguas, 2017. "The Effect of Natural Disasters on Economic Activity in US Counties: A Century of Data," NBER Working Papers 23410, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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