IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Impact of Beef Quality on Market Signals Transmitted by Grid Pricing

  • Johnson, Heather C.
  • Ward, Clement E.

Value-based marketing is shaping cattle production; however, market signals differ dramatically depending on carcass quality. This study applies a two-stage coefficients of separate determination procedure to four regional fed cattle datasets sorted by grid value and by carcass quality attributes. Weight is the strongest signal sent when higher valued cattle and better quality cattle are sold on a grid. Quality characteristics send stronger signals when lower valued cattle and poorer quality cattle are sold on a grid. Producers of lower quality cattle can potentially gain $52 to $149 per head by improving quality and $113 to $150 per head by adding weight.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/43750
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2006)
Issue (Month): 01 (April)
Pages:

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:43750
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.saea.org/jaae/jaae.htm

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Forristall, Cody & May, Gary J. & Lawrence, John D., 2002. "Assessing the Cost of Beef Quality," Staff General Research Papers 2101, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Johnson, Heather C. & Ward, Clement E., 2005. "Market Signals Transmitted by Grid Pricing," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(03), December.
  3. John D. Jackson, 1997. "Effects of Health Information and Generic Advertising on U.S. Meat Demand," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 13-23.
  4. McDonald, R. Allen & Schroeder, Ted C., 2003. "Fed Cattle Profit Determinants Under Grid Pricing," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 35(01), April.
  5. Fausti, Scott W. & Feuz, Dillon M. & Wagner, John J., 1998. "Value Based Marketing For Fed Cattle: A Discussion Of The Issues," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 1(01).
  6. Feuz, Dillon M., 1999. "Market Signals In Value-Based Pricing Premiums And Discounts," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 24(02), December.
  7. Greer, Heather C. & Trapp, James N., 2000. "Impact Of Alternative Grid Pricing Structures On Cattle Marketing Decisions," 2000 Conference, April 17-18 2000, Chicago, Illinois 18926, NCR-134 Conference on Applied Commodity Price Analysis, Forecasting, and Market Risk Management.
  8. Forristall, Cody & May, Gary J. & Lawrence, John D., 2002. "Assessing The Cost Of Beef Quality," 2002 Conference, April 22-23, 2002, St. Louis, Missouri 19060, NCR-134 Conference on Applied Commodity Price Analysis, Forecasting, and Market Risk Management.
  9. Unnevehr, Laurian J. & Bard, Sharon K., 1993. "Beef Quality: Will Consumers Pay For Less Fat?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 18(02), December.
  10. Lawrence, John D. & Forristall, Cody & May, Gary, 2002. "Assessing the Cost of Beef Quality," Staff General Research Papers 10467, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:43750. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.