IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/joaaec/143641.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Production of Economic Knowledge in Urban and Rural Areas: The Role of Student, Teacher, and School Characteristics

Author

Listed:
  • Butters, Roger
  • Asarta, Carlos
  • Thompson, Eric C.

Abstract

Many states are adopting economic education standards for the K–12 curriculum, mandating economic education courses in rural and urban schools. We examine economic education outcomes for rural and urban students using test scores gathered during a national high school academic competition and by estimating a production function for economic education. We find only limited differences between the education production function in urban and rural settings and lower average scores for rural students. To close this gap, results suggest that rural schools should place economic content in the senior-year curriculum and provide teachers with increased postgraduate training in economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Butters, Roger & Asarta, Carlos & Thompson, Eric C., 2013. "The Production of Economic Knowledge in Urban and Rural Areas: The Role of Student, Teacher, and School Characteristics," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 45(1), pages 1-15, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:143641
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.143641
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/143641/files/jaae509.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kurtis J. Swope & Pamela M. Schmitt, 2006. "The Performance of Economics Graduates over the Entire Curriculum: The Determinants of Success," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(4), pages 387-394, October.
    2. Roger B. Butters & Carlos J. Asarta, 2011. "A Survey of Economic Understanding in U.S. High Schools," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 200-205, June.
    3. J J Arias & Douglas M. Walker, 2004. "Additional Evidence on the Relationship between Class Size and Student Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 311-329, October.
    4. Walden, Michael L. & Sisak, Mark R., 1999. "School Inputs And Educational Outcomes In North Carolina: Comparison Of Static And Dynamic Analyses," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 31(3), pages 1-17, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Carlos J. Asarta & Roger B. Butters & Eric Thompson, 2013. "The Gender Question in Economic Education: Is it the Teacher or the Test?," Working Papers 13-12, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Carlos J. Asarta & Roger B. Butters & Eric Thompson, 2013. "The Gender Question in Economic Education: Is it the Teacher or the Test?," Working Papers 13-12, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    2. Carlos J. Asarta & Roger B. Butters & Andrew Perumal, 2013. "Success in Economics Major: Is it Path Dependent?," Working Papers 13-11, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    3. Leonard C. Smith, 2009. "An Analysis Of The Impact Of Pedagogic Interventions In First‐Year Academic Development And Mainstream Courses In Microeconomics," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(1), pages 162-178, March.
    4. Roger B. Butters & Carlos J. Asarta & Tammie J. Fischer, 2011. "Human Capital in The Classroom: The Role of Teacher Knowledge in Economic Literacy," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 56(2), pages 47-57, November.
    5. Robert G. Valletta & K. Jody Hoff & Jane S. Lopus, 2014. "Lost In Translation? Teacher Training And Outcomes In High School Economics Classes," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(4), pages 695-709, October.
    6. Ivo J. M. Arnold & Jerry T. Straten, 2012. "Motivation and Math Skills as Determinants of First-Year Performance in Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(1), pages 33-47, January.
    7. Yilmaz Guney, 2009. "Exogenous and Endogenous Factors Influencing Students' Performance in Undergraduate Accounting Modules," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 51-73.
    8. Lee E. Erickson & Patricia A. Erickson, 2013. "Predicting Student Performance Using Online One-Minute Papers," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 13(1), pages 6-13, Fall.
    9. Shihe Fu & V Brian Viard, 2019. "Commute costs and labor supply: evidence from a satellite campus," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(3), pages 723-752.
    10. Calimeris, Lauren, 2018. "Effects of flipping the principles of microeconomics class: Does scheduling matter?," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 29-43.
    11. Edelman, Mark A., Dr., 2000. "Potential Cost Savings and Framework of Strategies for Improved Delivery of Government Services," ISU General Staff Papers 200005010700001337, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    12. Sam Allgood & William B. Walstad & John J. Siegfried, 2015. "Research on Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(2), pages 285-325, June.
    13. Joakim Westerlund, 2007. "Class size and student evaluations in Sweden," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 19-28.
    14. Bea Chiang & Hossein Nouri & Subarna Samanta, 2014. "The Effects of Different Teaching Approaches in Introductory Financial Accounting," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 42-53, February.
    15. Adel Ben Youssef & Mounir Dahmani, 2008. "The Impact of ICT on Student Performance in Higher Education: Direct Effects, Indirect Effects and Organisational Change," Post-Print halshs-00936560, HAL.
    16. Rupert G. Rhodd & Sandra M. Schrouder & Marcus T. Allen, 2009. "Does the Performance on Principles of Economics Courses Affect the Overall Academic Success of Undergraduate Business Majors?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(1), pages 48-63.
    17. Juan Luis Jiménez & Jordi Perdiguero & Ancor Suárez, 2011. "Debating as a classroom tool for adapting learning outcomes to the European higher education area," IREA Working Papers 201109, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2011.
    18. Mandel, Philipp & Süssmuth, Bernd, 2011. "Size matters. The relevance and Hicksian surplus of preferred college class size," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1073-1084, October.
    19. Kim Sosin & Betty J. Lecha & Rajshree Agarwal & Robin L. Bartlett & Joseph I. Daniel, 2004. "Efficiency in the Use of Technology in Economic Education: Some Preliminary Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 253-258, May.
    20. Zhang, Lemin & Marsh, Dan, 2006. "How Can We Predict Performance in Tertiary Level Economics?," 2006 Conference, August 24-25, 2006, Nelson, New Zealand 31974, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession;

    JEL classification:

    • A21 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Pre-college
    • R5 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:143641. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/saeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.