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The Production of Economic Knowledge in Urban and Rural Areas: The Role of Student, Teacher, and School Characteristics

Author

Listed:
  • Butters, Roger
  • Asarta, Carlos
  • Thompson, Eric C.

Abstract

Many states are adopting economic education standards for the K–12 curriculum, mandating economic education courses in rural and urban schools. We examine economic education outcomes for rural and urban students using test scores gathered during a national high school academic competition and by estimating a production function for economic education. We find only limited differences between the education production function in urban and rural settings and lower average scores for rural students. To close this gap, results suggest that rural schools should place economic content in the senior-year curriculum and provide teachers with increased postgraduate training in economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Butters, Roger & Asarta, Carlos & Thompson, Eric C., 2013. "The Production of Economic Knowledge in Urban and Rural Areas: The Role of Student, Teacher, and School Characteristics," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 45(01), February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:143641
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/143641
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. J J Arias & Douglas M. Walker, 2004. "Additional Evidence on the Relationship between Class Size and Student Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 311-329, October.
    2. Walden, Michael L. & Sisak, Mark R., 1999. "School Inputs And Educational Outcomes In North Carolina: Comparison Of Static And Dynamic Analyses," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 31(03), December.
    3. Kurtis J. Swope & Pamela M. Schmitt, 2006. "The Performance of Economics Graduates over the Entire Curriculum: The Determinants of Success," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(4), pages 387-394, October.
    4. Roger B. Butters & Carlos J. Asarta, 2011. "A Survey of Economic Understanding in U.S. High Schools," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 200-205, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos J. Asarta & Roger B. Butters & Eric Thompson, 2013. "The Gender Question in Economic Education: Is it the Teacher or the Test?," Working Papers 13-12, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic education; rural; production function; Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession; A21; R5;

    JEL classification:

    • A21 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Pre-college
    • R5 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis

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