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Costs and Benefits of a WTO Dispute: Philippine Bananas and the Australian Market

Author

Listed:
  • Javelosa, Josyline C.
  • Schmitz, Andrew

Abstract

Why do governments engage in WTO disputes? What can countries expect to gain from international legal trade battles? This article examines the costs and benefits of the Philippine-Australian dispute regarding Australia's quarantine policy on Philippine fresh fruits and vegetables, a case also of keen interest to a number of countries including those in the European Union, the United States, Canada, Ecuador, Thailand, China, India, and Chile. We find that a host of institutional, political, and economic factors can trigger disputes under strong, yet debatable, expectations over winning a case in the WTO.

Suggested Citation

  • Javelosa, Josyline C. & Schmitz, Andrew, 2006. "Costs and Benefits of a WTO Dispute: Philippine Bananas and the Australian Market," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 7(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ecjilt:23824
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/23824
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James, Sallie & Anderson, Kym, 1998. "On the need for more economic assessment of quarantine/SPS policies," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 42(4), December.
    2. Valerie J. Picketts & Andrew Schmitz & Troy G. Schmitz, 1991. "Rent Seeking: The Potash Dispute between Canada and the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 73(2), pages 255-265.
    3. Orden, David, 2004. "Mexico-U.S. Avocado Trade Expansion," Keeping the Borders Open; Proceedings of the 8th Agricultural and Food Policy Systems Information Workshop - 2002 16916, Farm Foundation, Agricultural and Food Policy Systems Information Workshops.
    4. Butler, Monika & Hauser, Heinz, 2000. "The WTO Dispute Settlement System: First Assessment from an Economic Perspective," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 503-533, October.
    5. Currie, John Martin & Murphy, John A & Schmitz, Andrew, 1971. "The Concept of Economic Surplus and its Use in Economic Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 81(324), pages 741-799, December.
    6. Isaac, Grant E., 2004. "The SPS Agreement and Agri-food Trade Disputes: The Final Frontier," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 5(1).
    7. Guzman, Andrew & Simmons, Beth A, 2002. "To Settle or Empanel? An Empirical Analysis of Litigation and Settlement at the World Trade Organization," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 205-235, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ederington,Josh & Ruta,Michele, 2016. "Non-tariff measures and the world trading system," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7661, The World Bank.

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