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Effects of switching between production systems in dairy farming

Author

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  • Alvarez, Antonio
  • Arias, Carlos

Abstract

The increasing intensification of dairy farming in Europe has sparked an interest in studying the economic consequences of this process. However, empirically classifying farms as extensive or intensive is not a straightforward task. In recent papers, Latent Class Models (LCM) have been used to avoid an ad-hoc split of the sample into intensive and extensive dairy farms. A limitation of current specifications of LCM is that they do not allow farms to switch between different productive systems over time. This feature of the model is at odds with the process of intensification of the European dairy industry in recent decades. We allow for changes of production system over time by estimating a single LCM model but splitting the original panel into two periods, and find that the probability of using the intensive technology increases over time. Our estimation proposal opens up the possibility of studying the effects of intensification not only across farms but also over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Alvarez, Antonio & Arias, Carlos, 2015. "Effects of switching between production systems in dairy farming," Bio-based and Applied Economics Journal, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-16, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aieabj:205101
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kompas, Tom & Che, Tuong Nhu, 2006. "Technology choice and efficiency on Australian dairy farms," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 50(1), pages 1-19, March.
    2. Carol Newman & Alan Matthews, 2006. "The productivity performance of Irish dairy farms 1984–2000: a multiple output distance function approach," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 191-205, October.
    3. Tauer, Loren W. & Belbase, Krishna P., 1987. "Technical Efficiency Of New York Dairy Farms," Northeastern Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 16(1), pages 1-7, April.
    4. Antonio Alvarez & Julio del Corral, 2010. "Identifying different technologies using a latent class model: extensive versus intensive dairy farms," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 37(2), pages 231-250, June.
    5. Greene, William, 2005. "Reconsidering heterogeneity in panel data estimators of the stochastic frontier model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 126(2), pages 269-303, June.
    6. Álvarez, Antonio & del Corral, Julio & Solís, Daniel & Pérez, José Antonio, 2007. "Does Intensification Help to Improve the Economic Efficiency of Dairy Farms?," Efficiency Series Papers 2007/04, University of Oviedo, Department of Economics, Oviedo Efficiency Group (OEG).
    7. del Corral, J. & Pérez, J.A. & Roibás, D., 2010. "The impact of land fragmentation on milk production," Efficiency Series Papers 2010/02, University of Oviedo, Department of Economics, Oviedo Efficiency Group (OEG).
    8. Luis Orea & Subal C. Kumbhakar, 2004. "Efficiency measurement using a latent class stochastic frontier model," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 169-183, January.
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