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Farm Management analysis: a core discipline, simple sums, sophisticated thinking

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  • Malcolm, Bill

Abstract

In this paper it is argued that solving problems in farm management involves applying an appropriate balance of disciplinary knowledge. More specifically, farm management decision-making is about making choices, and the discipline of choice is economics. Thus economics is the core discipline of farm management analysis and decision-making. Modelling farm systems using the whole farm approach, with emphasis on the risky elements, can be very useful. Also enlightening is using real farm case studies to test research output. The conclusion is that bringing to bear on farm management questions a few disciplines, a few perspectives and a few figurings to explore a few futures is a useful way to go.

Suggested Citation

  • Malcolm, Bill, 2004. "Farm Management analysis: a core discipline, simple sums, sophisticated thinking," AFBM Journal, Australasian Farm Business Management Network, vol. 1.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:afbmau:120918
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/120918
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ronan, Glenn, 2002. "Delving and Divining for Australian Farm Management Agenda: 1970-2010," 2002 Conference (46th), February 13-15, 2002, Canberra 174039, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    2. Mullen, J. D., 2002. "Farm Management In The 21st Century," 2002 Conference (46th), February 13-15, 2002, Canberra 174072, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Ronan, Glenn, 2002. "Delving and Divining for Australian Farm Management Agenda: 1970-2010," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 10.
    4. Mullen, J.D., 2002. "Farm Management In The 21st Century," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 10.
    5. Kingwell, Ross S., 2002. "Issues for Farm Management in the 21st Century: A view from the West," 2002 Conference (46th), February 13-15, 2002, Canberra 173982, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    6. Pannell, David J. & Malcolm, Bill & Kingwell, Ross S., 2000. "Are we risking too much? Perspectives on risk in farm modelling," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 23(1), June.
    7. Kingwell, Ross, 2002. "Issues for Farm Management in the 21st Century: A view from the West," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 10.
    8. T. W. Schultz, 1939. "Theory of the Firm and Farm Management Research," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 21(3_Part_I), pages 570-586.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Glover, Sari, 2015. "How to think about what climate change might mean for a wool producer in Yass, New South Wales," AFBM Journal, Australasian Farm Business Management Network, vol. 12.
    2. Li, Xin & Paulson, Nicholas, 2014. "Is Farm Management Skill Persistent?," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170170, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Painter, Marvin J., 2007. "The impact of management skills on farm incomes in Canada," AFBM Journal, Australasian Farm Business Management Network, vol. 4(1/2).
    4. Hutchings, Timothy R. & Nordblom, Thomas L., 2011. "A financial analysis of the effect of the mix of crop and sheep enterprises on the risk profile of dryland farms in south-eastern Australia," AFBM Journal, Australasian Farm Business Management Network, vol. 8(1).
    5. Malcolm, Bill & Ho, Christie K.M. & Armstrong, Dan P. & Doyle, Peter T. & Tarrant, Katherine A. & Heard, J.W. & Leddin, C.M. & Wales, W.J., 2012. "Dairy Directions: a decade of whole farm analysis of dairy systems," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 20.
    6. Hutchings, Timothy R. & Nordblom, Thomas L. & Hayes, Richard C. & Li, Guangdi & Finlayson, John D., 2016. "A framework for modelling financial risk in Southern Australia: the intensive farming (IF) model," 2016 Conference (60th), February 2-5, 2016, Canberra, Australia 235333, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    7. Hutchings, T.R., 2013. "Financial risk on dryland farms in south-eastern Australia," Dissertations-Doctoral 204434, AgEcon Search.
    8. Hardaker, J. Brian, 2011. "The John L. Dillon Memorial Lecture 2010: The rise and fall of farm management as an academic discipline: an autobiographical perspective," AFBM Journal, Australasian Farm Business Management Network, vol. 8(1).

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