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Residential End-use Electricity Demand: Development over Time

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  • Hanne Marit Dalen and Bodil M. Larsen

Abstract

It is costly and difficult to meter electricity consumption for different end uses, e.g. space heating, lighting and household appliances. We deduce a model for using cross-sectional data for total annual electricity consumption for a sample of households, together with information from energy surveys, to estimate the end uses within an econometric demand model conditional on appliance ownership. By applying a consistent method to Norwegian data for 1990, 2001 and 2006 (repeated cross-sections), we compare results over time and detect possible trends. We find that electricity consumption for many end use necessities such as washing, water heating and refrigeration varies somewhat from year to year, but they show no trend. We find a steady increase in electricity used for more untraditional end uses and newer types of appliances. Total energy consumption for heating purposes is quite stable over the time period.

Suggested Citation

  • Hanne Marit Dalen and Bodil M. Larsen, 2015. "Residential End-use Electricity Demand: Development over Time," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:ej36-4-larsen
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Larsen, Bodil Merethe & Nesbakken, Runa, 2004. "Household electricity end-use consumption: results from econometric and engineering models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 179-200, March.
    2. Michael Parti & Cynthia Parti, 1980. "The Total and Appliance-Specific Conditional Demand for Electricity in the Household Sector," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 11(1), pages 309-321, Spring.
    3. Bauwens, Luc & Fiebig, Denzil G & Steel, Mark F J, 1994. "Estimating End-Use Demand: A Bayesian Approach," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(2), pages 221-231, April.
    4. Hsiao, Cheng & Mountain, Dean C & Illman, Kathleen Ho, 1995. "A Bayesian Integration of End-Use Metering and Conditional-Demand Analysis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(3), pages 315-326, July.
    5. Robert Bartels & G. Fiebig, 1990. "Integrating Direct Metering and Conditional Demand Analysis for Estimating End-Use Loads," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 79-98.
    6. Dennis J. Aigner & Cynts Sorooshian & Pamela Kerwin, 1984. "Conditional Demand Analysis for Estimating Residential End-Use Load Profiles," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 81-98.
    7. Robert Bartels & Denzil G. Fiebig, 2000. "Residential End-Use Electricity Demand: Results from a Designed Experiment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 51-81.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bye, Brita & Fæhn, Taran & Rosnes, Orvika, 2018. "Residential energy efficiency policies: Costs, emissions and rebound effects," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 191-201.
    2. Frondel, Manuel & Sommer, Stephan & Vance, Colin, 2019. "Heterogeneity in German Residential Electricity Consumption: A quantile regression approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 370-379.
    3. Frontuto, Vito, 2019. "Forecasting household consumption of fuels: A multiple discrete-continuous approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 240(C), pages 205-214.
    4. Frondel, Manuel & Sommer, Stephan & Vance, Colin, 2017. "Heterogeneity in residential electricity consumption: A quantile regression approach," Ruhr Economic Papers 722, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    5. Ibolya Czibere & Imre Kovách & Gergely Boldizsár Megyesi, 2020. "Environmental Citizenship and Energy Efficiency in Four European Countries (Italy, The Netherlands, Switzerland and Hungary)," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-18, February.
    6. Li, Chuan-Zhong & Wei, Chu & Yu, Yang, 2020. "Income threshold, household appliance ownership and residential energy consumption in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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