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Residential End-Use Electricity Demand: Results from a Designed Experiment

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  • Robert Bartels
  • Denzil G. Fiebig

Abstract

Being able to disaggregate total energy demand into components attributable to specific end uses provides useful information and represents a primary input into any attempt to simulate the impact of policies aimed at encouraging households to use less energy or shift load. Conceptually the estimation problem can be solved by directly metering individual appliances. Not surprisingly, this has not been widely practised and by far the most common estimation procedure has been the indirect statistical approach known as conditional demand analysis. More recently, with access to limited direct metering, both approaches have been used in combination. This paper reports on a substantial modelling exercise that represents a unique example of combining data of this type. The distinctive aspects are the extent and richness of the metering data and the fact that optimal design techniques were used to decide on the pattern of metering. As such, the empirical results are able to provide a very detailed and accurate picture of how total residential load is disaggregated by end uses. Significantly, the consumption of high penetration end uses such as lighting, which cannot be estimated by conventional conditional demand analysis, has been successfully estimated. Also, by matching our estimates of end-use load curves with some recent prices paid by distributors to purchase electricity from an electricity market pool, we have been able to determine the costs to distributors associated with servicing individual end uses.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Bartels & Denzil G. Fiebig, 2000. "Residential End-Use Electricity Demand: Results from a Designed Experiment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 51-81.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:2000v21-02-a03
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bodil M. Larsen & Runa Nesbakken, 2003. "How to quantify household electricity end-use consumption," Discussion Papers 346, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Frondel, Manuel & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2005. "Evaluating environmental programs: The perspective of modern evaluation research," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 515-526, December.
    3. Claudio Agostini & Cecilia Plottier & Eduardo Saavedra, 2009. "La Demanda Residencial por Energía Eléctrica en Chile," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv240, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
    4. Shigeru Matsumoto, "undated". "Electric Appliance Ownership and Usage: Application of Conditional Demand Analysis to Japanese Household Data," Working Papers e98, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    5. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell, 2005. "The residential demand for electricity in Australia: an application of the bounds testing approach to cointegration," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 467-474, March.
    6. Claudio A Agostini & Eduardo Saavedra, 2014. "Elasticities of Residential Electricity Demand in Chile," Working Papers wp_034, Adolfo Ibáñez University, School of Government.
    7. Shiljkut, Vladimir M. & Rajakovic, Nikola Lj., 2015. "Demand response capacity estimation in various supply areas," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 92(P3), pages 476-486.
    8. Hanne Marit Dalen and Bodil M. Larsen, 2015. "Residential End-use Electricity Demand: Development over Time," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    9. Mattias Vesterberg and Chandra Kiran B. Krishnamurthy, 2016. "Residential End-use Electricity Demand: Implications for Real Time Pricing in Sweden," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    10. Newsham, Guy R. & Donnelly, Cara L., 2013. "A model of residential energy end-use in Canada: Using conditional demand analysis to suggest policy options for community energy planners," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 133-142.
    11. Muhammad Akmal & David I. Stern, 2001. "The structure of Australian residential energy demand," Working Papers in Ecological Economics 0101, Australian National University, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Ecological Economics Program.
    12. Jovanović, Saša & Savić, Slobodan & Bojić, Milorad & Djordjević, Zorica & Nikolić, Danijela, 2015. "The impact of the mean daily air temperature change on electricity consumption," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 604-609.
    13. Hanne Marit Dalen & Bodil M. Larsen, 2013. "Residential end-use electricity demand. Development over time," Discussion Papers 736, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    14. Tongam Sihol Nababan, 2015. "Analysis of Household Characteristics Affecting the Demand of PLN’s Electricity. An Observation on Small Households in City of Medan, Indonesia," Academic Journal of Economic Studies, Faculty of Finance, Banking and Accountancy Bucharest,"Dimitrie Cantemir" Christian University Bucharest, vol. 1(2), pages 79-92, June.
    15. Swan, Lukas G. & Ugursal, V. Ismet, 2009. "Modeling of end-use energy consumption in the residential sector: A review of modeling techniques," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 13(8), pages 1819-1835, October.
    16. Claudio Agostini & M. Cecilia Plottier & Eduardo Saavedra, 2012. "Residential Demand for Electric Energy in Chile," Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 15(3), pages 64-83, December.
    17. Muhammad Akmal & David I. Stern, 2001. "Residential energy demand in Australia: an application of dynamic OLS," Working Papers in Ecological Economics 0104, Australian National University, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Ecological Economics Program.
    18. Muhammad, Akmal, 2002. "The structure of consumer energy demand in Australia: an application of a dynamic almost ideal demand system," 2002 Conference (46th), February 13-15, 2002, Canberra 125050, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    19. Matsumoto, Shigeru, 2016. "How do household characteristics affect appliance usage? Application of conditional demand analysis to Japanese household data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 214-223.
    20. Vesterberg, Mattias, 2016. "The hourly income elasticity of electricity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 188-197.
    21. Beccali, M. & Cellura, M. & Lo Brano, V. & Marvuglia, A., 2008. "Short-term prediction of household electricity consumption: Assessing weather sensitivity in a Mediterranean area," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 12(8), pages 2040-2065, October.
    22. Larsen, Bodil Merethe & Nesbakken, Runa, 2004. "Household electricity end-use consumption: results from econometric and engineering models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 179-200, March.

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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