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A Review of Avner Greif's Institutions and the Path to the Modern Economy: Lessons from Medieval Trade

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  • Gregory Clark

Abstract

Avner Greif's Institutions and the Path to the Modern Economy: Lessons from Medieval Trade (Cambridge University Press, 2006) is a major work in the ongoing project of many economists and economic historians to show that institutions are the fundamental driver of all economic history and of all contemporary differences in economic performance. This review outlines the contribution of this book to the project and the general status of this long standing ambition.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Clark, 2007. "A Review of Avner Greif's Institutions and the Path to the Modern Economy: Lessons from Medieval Trade," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(3), pages 725-741, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:45:y:2007:i:3:p:725-741
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jel.45.3.725
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. North, Douglass C, 1994. "Economic Performance through Time," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 359-368, June.
    2. Clark, Gregory, 1998. "Commons Sense: Common Property Rights, Efficiency, and Institutional Change," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(1), pages 73-102, March.
    3. Allen, Robert C, 1982. "The Efficiency and Distributional Consequences of Eighteenth Century Enclosures," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 937-953, December.
    4. North, Douglass C. & Weingast, Barry R., 1989. "Constitutions and Commitment: The Evolution of Institutions Governing Public Choice in Seventeenth-Century England," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(4), pages 803-832, December.
    5. Bogart, Dan, 2005. "Turnpike trusts and the transportation revolution in 18th century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 479-508, October.
    6. George Grantham, 2006. "Prehistoric Origins Of European Economic Integration," Departmental Working Papers 2006-28, McGill University, Department of Economics.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Do we know why nations fail?
      by Francesc Trillas in Real Progress on 2012-11-14 18:34:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "The Institution of Douglass North," MPRA Paper 21768, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Mika Kallioinen, 2017. "Inter‐communal institutions in medieval trade," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1131-1152, November.
    3. Paul Minard, 2020. "Institutions and China's comparative development," Papers 2001.02804, arXiv.org.
    4. Giovanni Dosi & Luigi Marengo & Alessandro Nuvolari, 2019. "Institutions are neither autistic maximizers nor flocks of birds: self-organization, power and learning in human organizations," Chapters, in: Francesca Gagliardi & David Gindis (ed.), Institutions and Evolution of Capitalism, chapter 13, pages 194-213, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Erik Lindberg, 2009. "Club goods and inefficient institutions: why Danzig and Lübeck failed in the early modern period," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(3), pages 604-628, August.
    6. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Growth, Quality, Happiness, and the Poor," MPRA Paper 17967, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. J-L.Demeulemeester & C.Diebolt, 2011. "New Institutional History of the Adaptive Efficiency of Higher Education Systems. Lessons from the Prussian Engineering Education: 1806-1914," Economies et Sociétés (Serie 'Histoire Economique Quantitative'), Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), issue 43, pages 33-63, January.
    8. Arnaud Buchs, 2012. "Périodiser les phases de régime et de crise des usages de l'eau. L'apport d'une approche en termes de modes d'usage de l'eau," Post-Print halshs-00716693, HAL.
    9. Ruth F.G. Williams & D.P. Doessel & Jerneja Sveticic, 2012. "Are there Regional Disparities in Suicide Rates? Quantifying Suicide Rates? Quantifying Suicide Distributions for Queensland, 1990-2007," Working Papers 2012.02, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    10. Kaire Põder, 2010. "Credible commitment and cartel: the case of the Hansa merchant in the guild of late medieval Tallin," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 10(1), pages 43-60, June.
    11. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "The Inheritance of Gregory Clark," MPRA Paper 21326, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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