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New Institutional History of the Adaptive Efficiency of Higher Education Systems. Lessons from the Prussian Engineering Education: 1806-1914

  • Jean Luc de Meulemeester

    ()

    (Université Libre de Bruxelles.)

  • Claude Diebolt

    ()

    (CNRS, Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg.)

In this paper, we study the evolution of the Prussian technical higher education system and analyse how it is affected by (and how it reacted to) the economic dynamic. We particularly stress the micro-foundations of institutional change, i.e. we analyse how the individual behaviour of the actors inside the technique higher education institutions contributes to their evolution for better or worse.

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Paper provided by Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC) in its series Working Papers with number 07-12.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:afc:wpaper:07-12
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.cliometrie.org

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  1. Greif, Avner, 1993. "Contract Enforceability and Economic Institutions in Early Trade: the Maghribi Traders' Coalition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 525-48, June.
  2. Fershtman, C. & Murphy, K.M., 1993. "Social Status, Education and Growth," Papers 8-93, Tel Aviv.
  3. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
  4. Yoram Weiss & Chaim Fershtman, 1997. "Social Status and Economic Performance: A Survey," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 139, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  5. Vandenbussche, Jérôme & Aghion, Philippe & Meghir, Costas, 2006. "Growth, distance to frontier and composition of human capital," Scholarly Articles 12490648, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  6. Jean Luc De Meulemeester & Claude Diebolt, 2007. "How much could economics gain from history: the contribution of cliometrics," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/13500, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  7. North, Douglass C., 1993. "Economic Performance through Time," Nobel Prize in Economics documents 1993-2, Nobel Prize Committee.
  8. J-L.De Meulemeester & O.Debande, 2003. "Capacité d'adaptation des systèmes d'enseignement supérieur: une perspective d'histoire institutionnelle et d'organisation industrielle," Economies et Sociétés (Serie 'Histoire Economique Quantitative'), Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), issue 30, pages 1745-1773, October.
  9. Jean Luc De Meulemeester & Jean-Christophe Defraigne, 2008. "Le système national d'économie politique de List: la fondation du réalisme pluridisciplinaire en économie politique internationale contre le libre-échangisme anglo-saxon," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/13468, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  10. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1990. "The Allocation of Talent: Implicationsfor Growth," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 65, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  11. Gregory Clark, 2007. "A Review of Avner Greif's Institutions and the Path to the Modern Economy: Lessons from Medieval Trade," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(3), pages 725-741, September.
  12. Paul A. David, 2007. "Path dependence: a foundational concept for historical social science," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 1(2), pages 91-114, July.
  13. Greif, Avner, 1998. "Historical and Comparative Institutional Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 80-84, May.
  14. Jérôme Vandenbussche & Philippe Aghion & Costas Meghir, 2006. "Growth, distance to frontier and composition of human capital," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 97-127, June.
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