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Does Gender Matter for Academic Promotion? Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment

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  • Zinovyeva, Natalia

    ()
    (CSIC Institute of Public Goods and Policies (IPP))

  • Bagues, Manuel F.

    ()
    (Aalto University)

Abstract

Several countries have recently introduced gender quotas in hiring and promotion committees at universities. This paper studies whether these policies increase the presence of women in top academic positions. The identification strategy exploits the random assignment mechanism in place between 2002 and 2006 in all academic disciplines in Spain to select the members of promotion committees. We find that a larger proportion of female evaluators increases the chances of success of female applicants to full professor positions. The magnitude of the effect is large: each additional woman on a committee composed of seven members increases the number of women promoted to full professor by 14%. Conversely, when committee members decide on promotions to associate professor positions, we do not observe any significant interaction between the gender of evaluators and the gender of candidates. If anything, in this case a larger share of female evaluators is associated with fewer successful female applicants. The evidence is consistent with the existence of ambivalent sexism.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5537.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5537

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Keywords: academic promotion; gender discrimination; randomized natural experiment;

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References

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  1. Donna K. Ginther & Shulamit Kahn, 2009. "Does Science Promote Women? Evidence from Academia 1973-2001," NBER Chapters, in: Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment, pages 163-194 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Boschini, Anne & Sjögren, Anna, 2004. "Is Team Formation Gender Neutral? Evidence from coauthorship patterns," Research Papers in Economics 2004:11, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
  3. Bagues, Manuel & Perez-Villadoniga, Maria J., 2012. "Do recruiters prefer applicants with similar skills? Evidence from a randomized natural experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 12-20.
  4. Almunia, Miguel & Dolado, Juan J. & Felgueroso, Florentino, 2005. "Do Men and Women Economists Choose the Same Research Fields?: Evidence From Top 50 Departments," CEPR Discussion Papers 5421, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Manuel F. Bagues & Berta Esteve-Volart, 2010. "Can Gender Parity Break the Glass Ceiling? Evidence from a Repeated Randomized Experiment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(4), pages 1301-1328.
  6. Alison Booth & Andrew Leigh, 2010. "Do employers discriminate by gender? A field experiment in female-dominated occupations," Natural Field Experiments 00200, The Field Experiments Website.
  7. Jason Abrevaya & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2012. "Charity and Favoritism in the Field: Are Female Economists Nicer (To Each Other)?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(1), pages 202-207, February.
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  11. Booth, Alison & Jeff Frank & David Blackaby, 2003. "Outside Offers and the Gender Pay Gap: Empirical Evidence from the UK Academic Labour Market," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 28, Royal Economic Society.
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  15. Manuel F. Bagues & Maria Jose Perez Villadoniga, 2008. "Why do I like people like me?," Business Economics Working Papers wb080601, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
  16. Lavy, Victor, 2008. "Do gender stereotypes reduce girls' or boys' human capital outcomes? Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(10-11), pages 2083-2105, October.
  17. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Linnemer, Laurent & Visser, Michael, 2008. "Publish or peer-rich? The role of skills and networks in hiring economics professors," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 423-441, June.
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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Does gender matter for academic promotion?
    by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-06-06 09:56:40
  2. Cómo no seleccionar a los profesores en la universidad
    by Samuel Bentolila in Nada Es Gratis on 2011-07-05 06:00:25
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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Cited by:
  1. Ginés DE RUS & M. Pilar SOCORRO, 2009. "Infrastructure investment and incentives with supranational funding," Departmental Working Papers 2009-18, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  2. Jose Apesteguia & Ghazala Azmat & Nagore Iriberri, 2010. "The impact of gender composition on team performance and decision-making: Evidence from the field," Economics Working Papers 1225, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  3. De Rus, Ginés, 2011. "The BCA of HSR Should the government invest in high speed rail infrastructure?," Working Papers 2011-12, FEDEA.
  4. Thomas Breda & Son Thierry Ly, 2012. "Do professors really perpetuate the gender gap in science? Evidence from a natural experiment in a French higher education institution," PSE Working Papers halshs-00677438, HAL.
  5. Maria De Paola & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2011. "Gender Discrimination and Evaluators’ Gender: Evidence from the Italian Academy," Working Papers 201106, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza (Ex Dipartimento di Economia e Statistica).
  6. Zinovyeva, Natalia & Bagues, Manuel F., 2012. "The Role of Connections in Academic Promotions," IZA Discussion Papers 6821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Conde-Ruiz, J. Ignacio & Gonzalez, Clara I., 2012. "Spain 2011 Pension Reform," Working Papers 2012-03, FEDEA.
  8. Manuel Bagues & Mauro Sylos-Labini & Natalia Zinovyeva, 2014. "Do gender quotas pass the test ? Evidence from academic evaluations in Italy," LEM Papers Series 2014/14, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  9. Baldwin, Kate & Bhavnani, Rikhil R., 2013. "Ancillary experiments: Opportunities and challenges," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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