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Skill Premia and Intergenerational Skill Transmission: The French Case

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Author Info

  • B. Ben Halima

    (EQUIPPE, Univ. of Lille 1 and MESHS)

  • N. Chusseau

    (EQUIPPE, Univ. of Lille 1 and MESHS)

  • J. Hellier

    ()
    (LEMNA, University of Nantes)

Abstract

In the case of France, we analyse the changes (i) in the skill premium linked to each level of education and (ii) in the impact of parents’ skill and income upon the educational attainment of their children. To this end, we build a theoretical model which is subsequently estimated. Our calculations firstly reveal (i) a critical decline in the skill premium of the Baccalaureate in relation to the lowest skill level, and (ii) an increase in the skill premia of higher education in relation to the Baccalaureate, which however is not large enough to avoid the decrease in all the skill premia relative to the lowest skill. Secondly, we find (i) a significant increase in the impact of the family backgrounds upon the individuals’ education from 1993 to 2003 which essentially derives from a higher impact of parental income upon the educational attainment, and (ii) an increase in the impact of public expenditure upon education. Consequently, if inequality has decreased among the employed population, the slowdown in intergenerational mobility could reverse this tendency in the longer term. This may however be offset by higher public educational expenditure.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality in its series Working Papers with number 285.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2013-285

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Keywords: Family backgrounds; intergenerational mobility; return to education; skill premium;

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Cited by:
  1. Nathalie Chusseau & Joël Hellier & Bassem Ben-Halima, 2012. "Education, Intergenerational Mobility and Inequality," Working Papers hal-00993472, HAL.
  2. Elise S. Brezis & Joël Hellier, 2013. "Social Mobility at the Top: Why Are Elites Self-Reproducing?," Working Papers 2013-12, Department of Economics, Bar-Ilan University.

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