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How Much Can We Learn from International Comparisons of Intergenerational Mobility?

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  • Jo Blanden

Abstract

This paper summarises research on the relative level of intergenerational mobility - whether classified by income, social class, social status or education - considering observations from 65 countries. With the exception of social class, the different approaches reveal similar patterns. South America, other developing nations, southern European countries and France tending to have rather limited mobility while the Nordic countries exhibit strong mobility. Evidence for the US and Germany differs across the measures, with Germany immobile on education and class and fairly mobile on income and the reverse true for the US. These differences are likely explained by greater within-group income inequality and persistence in the US. The second part of the paper finds that mobility is negatively correlated with inequality and the returns to education and positively correlated with a nation's education spending.

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File URL: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/ceedps/ceedp111.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE in its series CEE Discussion Papers with number 0111.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cep:ceedps:0111

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Web page: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/publications.htm

Related research

Keywords: Intergenerational mobility; public policy; inequality;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Roberto Angulo & Alejandro Gaviria & Gustavo Nicolás Páez & Joao Pedro Azevedo, 2012. "Movilidad social en Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 010323, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  2. Stephen Gibbons & Sandra McNally & Martina Viarengo, 2011. "Does Additional Spending Help Urban Schools? An Evaluation Using Boundary Discontinuities," CEE Discussion Papers 0128, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  3. Sandra E Black & Paul J Devereux, 2010. "Recent Developments in Intergenerational Mobility," Working Papers 201010, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
  4. Ben-Halima, B. & Chusseau, N. & Hellier, J., 2014. "Skill premia and intergenerational education mobility: The French case," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 50-64.
  5. Leonardo Bonilla, 2010. "Movilidad intergeneracional en educación en las ciudades," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
  6. Büchner Charlotte & Cörvers Frank & Traag Tanja & Velden Rolf van der, 2012. "How do Education, Cognitive Skills, Cultural and Social Capital Account for Intergenerational Earnings Persistence? Evidence from the Netherlands," Research Memorandum 028, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
  7. Felgueroso, Florentino & Gutiérrez-Domenech, María & Jiménez Martín, Sergi, 2013. "¿Por qué el abandono escolar se ha mantenido tan elevado en España en las últimas dos décadas? El papel de la Ley de Educación (LOGSE)," Economic Reports 02-2013, FEDEA.
  8. Michele Raitano & Francesco Vona, 2011. "Measuring the link between intergenerational occupational mobility and earnings: evidence from 8 European Countries," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2011-03, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  9. John Jerrim, 2012. "The Socio‐Economic Gradient in Teenagers' Reading Skills: How Does England Compare with Other Countries?," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 33(2), pages 159-184, 06.
  10. Orsetta Causa & Catherine Chapuis, 2009. "Equity in Student Achievement Across OECD Countries: An Investigation of the Role of Policies," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 708, OECD Publishing.
  11. Sajid Amin Javed & Mohammad Irfan, 2012. "Intergenerational Mobility: Evidence from Pakistan Panel Household Survey," Poverty and Social Dynamics Paper Series 2012:05, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.

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