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More Inequality, Less Social Mobility

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  • Dan Andrews
  • Andrew Leigh

Abstract

We investigate the relationship between inequality and intergenerational mobility. Proxying fathers’ earnings with using detailed occupational data, we find that sons who grew up in countries that were more unequal in the 1970s were less likely to have experienced social mobility by the late-1990s.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 566.

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Date of creation: Jan 2008
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Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:566

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Keywords: intergenerational mobility; income distribution; equality of opportunity;

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References

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  1. Leigh Andrew, 2007. "Intergenerational Mobility in Australia," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-28, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Javier Núñez & Leslie Miranda, 2011. "Intergenerational income and educational mobility in urban Chile," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 38(1 Year 20), pages 195-221, June.
  2. Orsetta Causa & Catherine Chapuis, 2009. "Equity in Student Achievement Across OECD Countries: An Investigation of the Role of Policies," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 708, OECD Publishing.
  3. Michele Raitano & Francesco Vona, 2011. "Measuring the link between intergenerational occupational mobility and earnings: evidence from 8 European Countries," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2011-03, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  4. Jo Blanden, 2009. "How Much Can We Learn from International Comparisons of Intergenerational Mobility?," CEE Discussion Papers 0111, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  5. Brück, Tilman & Esenaliev, Damir, 2013. "Post-Socialist Transition and the Intergenerational Transmission of Education in Kyrgyzstan," IZA Discussion Papers 7318, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Masashi Tanaka, 2013. "Human capital investment, Signaling, and Wage differentials," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 13-31, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  7. Brian Nolan & Gosta Esping-Andersen & Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2010. "The Role of Social Institutions in Inter-Generational Mobility," Working Papers 201018, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  8. Miles Corak, 2013. "Income Inequality, Equality of Opportunity, and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(3), pages 79-102, Summer.
  9. Christopher Herrington, 2013. "Public Education Financing Systems, Earnings Inequality, and Intergenerational Mobility," 2013 Meeting Papers 1233, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  10. Jo Blanden, 2009. "How much can we learn from international comparisons of intergenerational mobility?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28283, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  11. Guillermo Cruces & Marcelo Bérgolo & Andriana Conconi & Andrés Ham, 2012. "Are there Etchnic Inequality Traps in Education ? Empirical Evidence for Brazil and Chile," Working Papers PMMA 2012-05, PEP-PMMA.
  12. Bonev, Pavlin, 2013. "Government Intervention in Postsecondary Education in Bulgaria," MPRA Paper 52669, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Till van Treeck, 2012. "Did inequality cause the U.S. financial crisis?," IMK Working Paper 91-2012, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.

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