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Un Análisis Empírico de las No Linealidades en la Movilidad Intergeneracional del Ingreso. El caso de la Argentina

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  • Maribel Jiménez

    (Maestría en Economía - FCE - UNLP)

Abstract

The principal aim of this paper is quantify and examine intergenerational earnings mobility in Argentina, exploring particularly the hypothesis of variation of the degree of intergenerational (in)mobility across childs´s and parents’s income distribution, by the implementation of econometrics methods utilized in recent empirical literature for nonlongitudinal data. The results derived from the information of two samples from the Permanent Household Survey of 1986 and 2006 suggest that parents´s earnings correlate more strongly with daughter´s earnings than they do with that of a son. Also, intergenerational persistence varies across childs´s and parents’s income distribution. In general, the effect of father´s and mother´s earning is higher for childrens in the lower income quantiles. Moreover, the intergenerational income elasticities in every quantil of the childs, for different sections of parents’s income distribution, are considerably distinct. In synthesis, the results uncover the existence of significant nonlinearities in the intergenerational earnings relationship. El principal objetivo de este estudio es cuantificar y examinar la movilidad intergeneracional del ingreso en la Argentina, explorando la hipótesis de variación del grado de (in)movilidad a lo largo de la distribución del ingreso correspondiente a los hijos así como a los padres, a través de la aplicación de métodos econométricos utilizados en la literatura empírica reciente para datos no longitudinales. Los resultados, obtenidos a partir de la información proveniente de dos muestras de la Encuesta Permanente de Hogares de 1986 y 2006, sugieren que el ingreso laboral de los padres está correlacionado más fuertemente con el ingreso de las hijas que con el de los hijos varones. Asimismo, se observa que la persistencia intergeneracional varía a lo largo de la distribución del ingreso laboral de los hijos y de los padres. En general, el efecto del ingreso laboral del padre y de la madre es mayor para los hijos que se encuentran en los cuantiles más bajos. Por otra parte, las elasticidades intergeneracionales del ingreso estimadas en cada cuantil de los hijos, para diferentes tramos de la distribución del ingreso laboral de los padres, son considerablemente distintas. En síntesis, los resultados revelan la existencia de significativas no linealidades en la relación intergeneracional del ingreso laboral.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata in its series CEDLAS, Working Papers with number 0114.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0114

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Web page: http://cedlas.econo.unlp.edu.ar/
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