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Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain

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  • Blanden, Jo

    (University College London and L.S.E.)

  • Alissa Goodman

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Paul Gregg

    (University of Bristol and L.S.E.)

  • Stephen Machin

Abstract

This paper compares and contrasts estimates of the extent of intergenerational income mobility over time in Britain. Estimates based on two British birth cohorts show that mobility appears to have fallen in a cross-cohort comparison of people who grew up in the 1960s and 1970s (the 1958 birth cohort) as compared to a cohort who grew up in the 1970s and 1980s (the 1970 birth cohort). The sensitivity of labour market earnings to parental income rises, thereby showing less intergenerational mobility for the more recent cohort. This supports theoretical notions that the widening wage and income distribution that occurred from the late 1970s onwards slowed down the extent of mobility up or down the distribution across generations.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Royal Economic Society in its series Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 with number 31.

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Date of creation: 29 Aug 2002
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Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2002:31

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Web page: http://www.res.org.uk/society/annualconf.asp
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  1. A. B. Atkinson, 1981. "On Intergenerational Income Mobility in Britain," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 3(2), pages 194-218, January.
  2. repec:ese:iserwp:2002-11 is not listed on IDEAS
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  1. Social mobility matters, and government can affect the mechanisms which promote it
    by Blog Admin in British Politics and Policy at LSE on 2013-11-04 14:00:12
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