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Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in Singapore and the United States

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Author Info

  • Irene YH Ng

    (Department of Social Work, National University of Singapore, Singapore)

  • Xiaoyi Shen

    (Department of Social Work, National University of Singapore, Singapore)

  • Kong Weng Ho

    (Division of Economics, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Abstract

This study compared intergenerational earnings mobility in Singapore and the United States by replicating the limitations in the Singapore National Youth Survey on the U.S. Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The mean estimated earnings elasticities are almost identical: 0.26 in Singapore and 0.27 in the United States. Transformed to 0.45 and 0.47 respectively to reflect permanent status, mobility in the two countries is moderately low compared internationally. The finding of similar mobility is not surprising given that the economic realities, welfare systems, education regimes, and labor structures in the two countries are similar. Policy makers face the daunting challenge of overcoming immobility and inequality while maintaining global competitiveness.

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File URL: http://www.ntu.edu.sg/hss2/egc/wp/2008/2008-03.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Nanyang Technolgical University, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Economic Growth centre in its series Economic Growth centre Working Paper Series with number 0803.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nan:wpaper:0803

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Web page: http://egc.hss.ntu.edu.sg/
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Keywords: Intergenerational earnings mobility; Singapore; United States;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Jäntti, Markus & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Income Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 7730, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Maribel Jimenez & Monica Jimenez, 2009. "La Movilidad Intergeneracional del Ingreso: Evidencia para Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0084, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  3. Maribel Jiménez, 2011. "Un Análisis Empírico de las No Linealidades en la Movilidad Intergeneracional del Ingreso. El caso de la Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0114, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

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