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Peer effects in development programme awareness of vulnerable groups in rural Tanzania

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  • Bet Caeyers
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    Abstract

    A pre-condition for grassroots participation, key for community-based development success, is widespread programme knowledge among the eligible population. The current literature on local participatory institutions mainly focuses on village meetings and media campaigns as a means to strengthen community awareness. The role played by social interactions in this process has received little attention to date. In this paper I use Manski’s (1993) standard linear-in-means model to estimate endogenous peer effects on the awareness of vulnerable groups on Tanzania Social Action Fund II (TASAF II), i.e. Tanzania’s flagship community-driven development programme. I employ a popular 2SLS estimation strategy developed by Bramouille et al. (2009) and De Giorgi et al. (2010) on a unique spatial household dataset from Tanzania to eliminate both the ‘reflection bias’ (Manski, 1993) and the ‘exclusion bias’ (Caeyers, 2014). Denoting the geographically nearest neighbours set as the relevant peer group in this context, I identify significant average and heterogeneous endogenous social interaction effects in the diffusion of information about TASAF II. The findings of this paper inform the design of effective sensitisation campaigns.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford in its series CSAE Working Paper Series with number 2014-11.

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    Date of creation: 2014
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    Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2014-11

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