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The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills

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  • Fiorini, M.

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the effect of using a home computer on children's development. In most OECD countries 70% or more of the households have a computer at home and children use computers quite extensively, even at very young ages. We use data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC), which follows an Australian cohort born in 1999/2000. Skills and computer usage information is collected when children are approximately 5 and 7 years old. For cognitive skills, our results indicate that computer time has a positive effect. For non-cognitive skills the evidence is mixed, the effect depending on the score and the age of the children. We test the robustness of our results by comparing OLS, IV and Value Added estimators. Generally, the IV estimates are larger and the Value Added estimates lower than the OLS ones. However the pattern of the results is quite consistent.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 55-72

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:1:p:55-72

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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Keywords: Human capital Productivity;

References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Fairlie, Robert W., 2012. "The effects of home access to technology on computer skills: Evidence from a field experiment," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 243-253.
  2. Robert W. Fairlie & Jonathan Robinson, 2013. "Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Home Computers on Academic Achievement among Schoolchildren," CESifo Working Paper Series 4128, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Jacob L. Vigdor & Helen F. Ladd, 2010. "Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 16078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Michael Keane & Mario Fiorini, 2012. "How the Allocation of Children's Time Affects Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Development," Economics Series Working Papers 2012-W09, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. Fairlie, Robert W. & Grunberg, Samantha H., 2013. "Access to Techonology and the Transfer Function of Community Colleges: Evidence from a Field Experiment," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt2gw7r2xk, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  6. Agne Suziedelyte, 2012. "Can video games affect children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills?," Discussion Papers 2012-37, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  7. Robert Fairlie & Jonathan Robinson, 2011. "The Effects of Home Computers on Educational Outcomes. Evidence from a Field Experiment with Schoolchildren," Working Papers 11-14, NET Institute, revised Sep 2011.
  8. Fairlie, Robert W., 2012. "Academic achievement, technology and race: Experimental evidence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 663-679.
  9. Mo, Di & Swinnen, Johan & Zhang, Linxiu & Yi, Hongmei & Qu, Qinghe & Boswell, Matthew & Rozelle, Scott, 2013. "Can One-to-One Computing Narrow the Digital Divide and the Educational Gap in China? The Case of Beijing Migrant Schools," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 14-29.

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