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Citations for "Lobbies and Technology Diffusion"

by Diego Comin & Bart Hobijn

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  1. Diego A. Comin & William Easterly & Erick Gong, 2008. "Was the Wealth of Nations Determined in 1000 B.C.?," Harvard Business School Working Papers 09-052, Harvard Business School.
  2. Alberto Alesina & Joeph Zeira, . "Technology and Labor Regulations," Working Papers 0729, University of Crete, Department of Economics.
  3. Diego A. Comin & Bart Hobijn, 2009. "The CHAT Dataset," NBER Working Papers 15319, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Diego Comin & Bart Hobijn, 2010. "Technology diffusion and postwar growth," Working Paper Series 2010-16, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  5. Gancia, Gino A & Müller, Andreas & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 2011. "Structural Development Accounting," CEPR Discussion Papers 8254, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Diego Comin & Bart Hobiijn, 2006. "An Exploration of Technology Diffusion," NBER Working Papers 12314, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Francesco Daveri & Maria Laura Parisi, 2010. "Experience, Innovation and Productivity - Empirical Evidence from Italy's Slowdown," CESifo Working Paper Series 3123, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. Luca Anderlini & Leonardo Felli & Giovanni Immordino & Alessandro Riboni, 2011. "Legal Institutions, Innovation and Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 3489, CESifo Group Munich.
  9. Diego A. Comin & Bart Hobijn & Emilie Rovito, 2006. "World Technology Usage Lags," NBER Working Papers 12677, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Diego A. Comin & Martí Mestieri, 2013. "Technology Diffusion: Measurement, Causes and Consequences," NBER Working Papers 19052, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Venturini, Francesco, 2012. "Looking into the black box of Schumpeterian growth theories: An empirical assessment of R&D races," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 1530-1545.
  12. Bellettini, Giorgio & Berti Ceroni, Carlotta & Prarolo, Giovanni, 2013. "Political persistence and economic growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 165-179.
  13. Galang, Roberto Martin N., 2014. "Divergent diffusion: Understanding the interaction between institutions, firms, networks and knowledge in the international adoption of technology," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 512-521.
  14. Thomas Sampson, 2012. "Brain drain or brain gain? Technology diffusion and learning on-the-job," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51503, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  15. Thomas Sampson, 2012. "Brain Drain or Brain Gain? Technology Diffusion and Learning On-the-job," CEP Discussion Papers dp1168, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  16. Sampson, Thomas, 2013. "Brain drain or brain gain? Technology diffusion and learning on-the-job," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 162-176.
  17. Diego Comin & Bart Hobijn & Emilie Rovito, 2008. "Technology usage lags," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 237-256, December.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.