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Citations for "Are There Thresholds of Current Account Adjustment in the G7?"

by Richard H. Clarida & Manuela Goretti & Mark P. Taylor

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  1. Menzie D. Chinn & Jaewoo Lee, 2005. "Three Current Account Balances: A "Semi-Structuralist" Interpretation," NBER Working Papers 11853, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Vahagn Galstyan, 2007. "How Persistent are International Capital Flows?," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp232, IIIS.
  3. Charles Engel & John H. Rogers, 2006. "The U.S. current account deficit and the expected share of world output," International Finance Discussion Papers 856, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Mark J. Holmes & Theodore Panagiotidis, 2009. "Cointegration And Asymmetric Adjustment: Some New Evidence Concerning The Behaviour Of The Us Current Account," Working Paper Series 16_09, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  5. Blaise Gnimassoun, 2014. "The importance of the exchange rate regime in limiting current account imbalances in sub-Saharan African countries," EconomiX Working Papers 2014-22, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX.
  6. Chen, Shyh-Wei, 2014. "Smooth transition, non-linearity and current account sustainability: Evidence from the European countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 541-554.
  7. Radulescu, Magdalena, 2006. "The Impact of the National Bank of Romania's Monetary Policy on the Banking Credits, the Domestic Savings and Investments (As Compared to the Other Central and Eastern European Countries)," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 3(2), pages 10-31, June.
  8. Philip R. Lane and Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, 2008. "Where Did All The Borrowing Go? A Forensic Analysis of the U.S. External Position," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp239, IIIS.
  9. Blaise Gnimassoun & Valérie Mignon, 2013. "Current-Account Adjustments and Exchange-Rate Misalignments," Working Papers 2013-29, CEPII research center.
  10. Jiandong Ju & Shang-Jin Wei, 2007. "Current Account Adjustment: Some New Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 13388, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Francisco Serranito & Jean-Baptiste Gossé, 2014. "Long-run determinants of current accounts in OECD countries: Lessons for intra-European imbalances," Post-Print hal-01384673, HAL.
  12. De Santis, Roberto A. & Lührmann, Melanie, 2006. "On the determinants of external imbalances and net international portfolio flows: a global perspective," Working Paper Series 0651, European Central Bank.
  13. Kai Guo & Keyu Jin, 2009. "Composition and growth effects of the current account: a synthesized portfolio view," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25826, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  14. Ken Coutts & Bob Rowthorn, 2009. "Prospects for the UK Balance of Payments," ESRC Centre for Business Research - Working Papers wp394, ESRC Centre for Business Research.
  15. Caroline Freund & Frank Warnock, 2005. "Current Account Deficits in Industrial Countries: The Bigger They are, the Harder They Fall?," NBER Working Papers 11823, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Charles Engel, 2005. "The US Current Account Deficit: A Re-examination of the Role of Private Saving," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2005-09, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  17. Herrmann, Sabine, 2009. "Do we really know that flexible exchange rates facilitate current account adjustment? Some new empirical evidence for CEE countries," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2009,22, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  18. Blaise Gnimassoun & Valérie Mignon, 2015. "Persistence of Current-account Disequilibria and Real Exchange-rate Misalignments," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(1), pages 137-159, 02.
  19. Dimitris K. Christopoulos & Miguel León-Ledesma, 2004. "Current Account Sustainability in the US: What Do We Really Know About It?," Studies in Economics 0412, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  20. Aleksander Aristovnik, 2005. "Current Account Reversals In Selected Transition Countries," International Finance 0510021, EconWPA.
  21. Bernardina Algieri & Thierry Bracke, 2007. "Patterns of Current Account Adjustment – Insights from Past Experience," CESifo Working Paper Series 2029, CESifo Group Munich.
  22. Aleksander Aristovnik & Andrej Kumar, 2006. "Some Characteristics of Sharp Current Account Deficit Reversals in Transition Countries," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 4(1), pages 9-45.
  23. Duncan, Roberto, 2015. "Does the US current account show a symmetric behavior over the business cycle?," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 253, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  24. Bailliu, Jeannine & Dib, Ali & Kano, Takashi & Schembri, Lawrence, 2014. "Multilateral adjustment, regime switching and real exchange rate dynamics," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 68-87.
  25. Kim, Bong-Han & Min, Hong-Ghi & Hwang, Young-Soon & McDonald, Judith A., 2009. "Are Asian countries' current accounts sustainable? Deficits, even when associated with high investment, are not costless," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 163-179.
  26. Rafiq, Sohrab, 2010. "Fiscal stance, the current account and the real exchange rate: Some empirical estimates from a time-varying framework," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 276-290, November.
  27. repec:trn:utwpde:0905 is not listed on IDEAS
  28. Jiandong Ju & Kang Shi & Shang-Jin Wei, 2013. "On the Connections between Intra-temporal and Intertemporal Trades," NBER Chapters, in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2013, pages 36-51 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  29. Chen, Shyh-Wei & Xie, Zixiong, 2015. "Testing for current account sustainability under assumptions of smooth break and nonlinearity," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 142-156.
  30. Algieri, Bernardina & Bracke, Thierry, 2007. "Patterns of current account adjustment: insights from past experience," Working Paper Series 0762, European Central Bank.
  31. Lars Calmfors & Giancarlo Corsetti & Seppo Honkapohja & John Kay & Gilles Saint-Paul & Hans-Werner Sinn & Jan-Egbert Sturm & Xavier Vives, 2006. "Chapter 2: Global Imbalances," EEAG Report on the European Economy, CESifo Group Munich, vol. 0, pages 50-67, 03.
  32. Joseph E. Gagnon, 2014. "Alternatives to Currency Manipulation: What Switzerland, Singapore, and Hong Kong Can Do," Policy Briefs PB14-17, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  33. Blaise Gnimassoun & Valérie Mignon, 2014. "How macroeconomic imbalances interact? Evidence from a panel VAR analysis," EconomiX Working Papers 2014-5, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX.
  34. Aleksander Aristovnik, 2006. "Current Account Reversals and Persistency in Transition Regions," Zagreb International Review of Economics and Business, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb, vol. 9(1), pages 1-43, May.
  35. Radulescu, Magdalena, 2007. "The impact of the National Bank of Romania Monetary Policy on the Balance of Payments," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 4(2), pages 26-43, June.
  36. Jiandong Ju & Kang Shi & Shang-Jin Wei, 2011. "On the Connections between Intertemporal and Intra-temporal Trades," NBER Working Papers 17549, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  37. Dimitri B. Papadimitriou & Gennaro Zezza & Greg Hannsgen, 2006. "Can Global Imbalances Continue?: Policies for the U.S. Economy," Economics Strategic Analysis Archive sa_nov_06, Levy Economics Institute.
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