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Property Rights, Labor Mobility and Collectivization: The Impact of Institutional Changes on China’s Agriculture in 1950-1978

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Listed:
  • Sun, Shengmin

    (Shandong University)

  • Lopez, Rigoberto A.

    () (University of Connecticut)

  • Xiaoou Liu

    () (Renmin University of China)

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact of property rights, labor mobility barriers and degrees of collectivization on China’s agricultural growth in 1950-1978. Using a semi-Bayesian stochastic frontier analysis, we find that collective production with free labor mobility and private property rights was the most efficient institutional setting. Although deviations from the two institutions resulted in a decline in agricultural production, the loss in agricultural production from labor mobility barriers was up to five times greater than loss from depriving farmers of private property rights.

Suggested Citation

  • Sun, Shengmin & Lopez, Rigoberto A. & Xiaoou Liu, 2016. "Property Rights, Labor Mobility and Collectivization: The Impact of Institutional Changes on China’s Agriculture in 1950-1978," Working Papers 41, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:zwi:wpaper:41
    as

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    File URL: http://zwickcenter.uconn.edu/working_papers_10_1288706231.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Griffin, J. E. & Steel, M. F. J., 2004. "Semiparametric Bayesian inference for stochastic frontier models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 121-152, November.
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    5. Lin, Justin Yifu, 1990. "Collectivization and China's Agricultural Crisis in 1959-1961," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(6), pages 1228-1252, December.
    6. Yang, Xiaokai & Wang, Jiangou & Wills, Ian, 1992. "Economic growth, commercialization, and institutional changes in rural China, 1979-1987," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 1-37.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic growth; institutions; agriculture; property rights; labor mobility; China;

    JEL classification:

    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • N55 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Asia including Middle East

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