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Accounting for Environmental Influences in Stochastic Frontier Models: With Application to International Airlines

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  • Tim Coelli
  • Sergio Perelman
  • Elliot Romano

Abstract

The principal aim of this paper is to measure the efficiency of international airlines. We obtain measures of technical efficiency from stochastic frontier production functions which have been adjusted to account for environmental influences such as network conditions, geographical factors, etc. We observe that two alternative approaches to this problem have been proposed in the efficiency measurement literature. One assumes that the environmental factors influence the shape of the technology while the other assumes that they directly influence the degree of technical inefficiency. In this paper we compare the results obtained when using these two approaches. The two sets of results provide similar rankings of airlines but suggest differing degrees of technical inefficiency. Both sets of results also suggest that Asian/Oceanic airlines are technically more efficient than European and North American airlines but that the differences are essentially due to more favourable environmental conditions. Nevertheless, it is among Asian companies that the major improvements in managerial efficiency (technical efficiency with environmental factors netted out) took place over the sample period (1977–1990). Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Coelli & Sergio Perelman & Elliot Romano, 1999. "Accounting for Environmental Influences in Stochastic Frontier Models: With Application to International Airlines," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 251-273, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jproda:v:11:y:1999:i:3:p:251-273
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1007794121363
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    References listed on IDEAS

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