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Financial Globalization, International Business Cycles, and Consumption Risk Sharing

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  • Michael J. Artis
  • Mathias Hoffmann

Abstract

In spite of two decades of financial globalization, consumption-based indicators do not seem to signal more international risk sharing. We argue that consumption risk sharing among industrialised countries has actually increased - in particular since the 1990s - but that standard consumption-based measures of risk sharing - such as the volatility of consumption conditional on output or international consumption correlations - have been unable to detect this increase. The reason is that consumption has also been affected by the concurrent decline in the volatility of output growth in most industrialised countries since the 1980s. As a first important driver of this decline we identify a more gradual response of output to permanent idiosyncratic shocks. Since consumption reacts mainly to permanent shocks, it appears more volatile in relation to current changes in output. This effect seems to have offset the tendency of financial globalization to lower the volatility of consumption conditional on output. Secondly, because the variability of permanent global shocks has also fallen, international consumption correlations have also generally not increased as financial markets have become more integrated.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael J. Artis & Mathias Hoffmann, 2007. "Financial Globalization, International Business Cycles, and Consumption Risk Sharing," IEW - Working Papers 346, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  • Handle: RePEc:zur:iewwpx:346
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bai, Yan & Zhang, Jing, 2012. "Financial integration and international risk sharing," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 17-32.
    2. Pierfederico Asdrubali & Bent E. Sørensen & Oved Yosha, 1996. "Channels of Interstate Risk Sharing: United States 1963–1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(4), pages 1081-1110.
    3. Becker, Sascha O. & Hoffmann, Mathias, 2006. "Intra- and international risk-sharing in the short run and the long run," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 777-806, April.
    4. Stockman, Alan C & Tesar, Linda L, 1995. "Tastes and Technology in a Two-Country Model of the Business Cycle: Explaining International Comovements," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 168-185, March.
    5. Pedro Perez & Denise Osborn & Michael Artis, 2006. "The International Business Cycle in a Changing World: Volatility and the Propagation of Shocks in the G-7," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 255-279, July.
    6. Heathcote, Jonathan & Perri, Fabrizio, 2004. "Financial globalization and real regionalization," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 119(1), pages 207-243, November.
    7. Imbs, Jean, 2006. "The real effects of financial integration," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 296-324, March.
    8. Richard Blundell & Luigi Pistaferri & Ian Preston, 2008. "Consumption Inequality and Partial Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 1887-1921, December.
    9. Vincent Labhard & Michael Sawicki, 2006. "International and intranational consumption risk sharing: the evidence for the United Kingdom and OECD," Bank of England working papers 302, Bank of England.
    10. Jonathan Heathcote & Kjetil Storesletten & Giovanni L. Violante, 2014. "Consumption and Labor Supply with Partial Insurance: An Analytical Framework," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(7), pages 2075-2126, July.
    11. Michael D. Bordo & Thomas Helbling, 2003. "Have National Business Cycles Become More Synchronized?," NBER Working Papers 10130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption Risk Sharing; International Business Cycles; Great Moderation; Financial Integration and Capital Flows; Home Bias;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration

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