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The true art of the tax deal: Evidence on aid flows and bilateral double tax agreements

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  • Braun, Julia
  • Zagler, Martin

Abstract

Out of a total of 2,976 double tax agreements (DTAs), some 60% are signed between a developing and a developed economy. As DTAs shift taxing rights from capital importing to capital exporting countries, the prior would incur a loss. We demonstrate in a theoretical model that in a deal one country does not trump the other, but that the deal must be mutually beneficial. In the case of an asymmetric DTA, this requires compensation from the capital exporting country to the capital importing country. We provide empirical evidence that such compensation is indeed paid, for instance in the form of bilateral official development assistance, which increases on average by six million US$ in the year of the signature of a DTA.

Suggested Citation

  • Braun, Julia & Zagler, Martin, 2017. "The true art of the tax deal: Evidence on aid flows and bilateral double tax agreements," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-011, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:17011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chisik, Richard & Davies, Ronald B., 2004. "Asymmetric FDI and tax-treaty bargaining: theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(6), pages 1119-1148, June.
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    Keywords

    developing countries; foreign aid; double taxation agreements;

    JEL classification:

    • K33 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - International Law
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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