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Direct and indirect effects of weather experiences on life satisfaction: Which role for climate change expectations?

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  • Osberghaus, Daniel
  • Kühling, Jan

Abstract

This paper deals with the effect of (i) damage experience from extreme weather events and (ii) expectations concerning future climate change on subjective wellbeing (SWB). We use data of a large representative survey amongst German households. The effect of experienced weather events on SWB of the heads of the households is only significant for heat waves; not for storms, heavy rain, and floods. Concern about future climate change on the household level has a substantial negative impact on current SWB. Moreover, we divide the impact of experience into direct effects of damage and indirect effects, which affect current SWB via the channel of expectations regarding future climate change. Both direct and indirect effects of weather experiences are quantified. It becomes apparent that the indirect effect is significant but small compared to the direct effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Osberghaus, Daniel & Kühling, Jan, 2014. "Direct and indirect effects of weather experiences on life satisfaction: Which role for climate change expectations?," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-042, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:14042
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Grün, Carola & Grunewald, Nicole, 2010. "Subjective Well Being and the Impact of Climate Change," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 61, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Frondel, Manuel & Simora, Michael & Sommer, Stephan, 2017. "Risk Perception of Climate Change: Empirical Evidence for Germany," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 173-183.
    2. Alan Piper, 2014. "Zukunftsangst! Fear of (and Hope for) the Future and Its Impact on Life Satisfaction," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 706, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. repec:eee:ecolec:v:159:y:2019:i:c:p:344-353 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. von Möllendorff, Charlotte & Hirschfeld, Jesko, 2016. "Measuring impacts of extreme weather events using the life satisfaction approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 108-116.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate change; subjective well-being; extreme weather events; household survey;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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