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Transaction Cost Heterogeneity in the Interbank Market and Monetary Policy Implementation under alternative Interest Corridor Systems

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  • Link, Thomas
  • Neyer, Ulrike

Abstract

This paper introduces a theoretical model of an interbank market and a central bank that implements an interest corridor system in order to exert control over the overnight interbank rate. We analyze in how far interbank market frictions in the form of broadly defined transaction costs influence banks' demand for excess reserves and the interbank market outcome under different corridor regimes. The friction costs might stem from asymmetric information about counterparty credit risks, reflect differing borrowing/lending conditions in fragmented money markets, or result from new regulatory capital rules affecting interbank exposures. We show that the transaction cost effect on banks' demand for excess reserves and on the interbank market outcome, as well as the importance of bank transaction cost heterogeneity and of the corridor width in this context, depend crucially on whether the central bank runs a standard or a floor operating system.

Suggested Citation

  • Link, Thomas & Neyer, Ulrike, 2016. "Transaction Cost Heterogeneity in the Interbank Market and Monetary Policy Implementation under alternative Interest Corridor Systems," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145853, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc16:145853
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Moschitz, Julius, 2004. "The determinants of the overnight interest rate in the euro area," Working Paper Series 393, European Central Bank.
    2. Xavier Freixas & Jos… Jorge, 2008. "The Role of Interbank Markets in Monetary Policy: A Model with Rationing," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(6), pages 1151-1176, September.
    3. Bucher, Monika & Hauck, Achim & Neyer, Ulrike, 2014. "Frictions in the interbank market and uncertain liquidity needs: Implications for monetary policy implementation," DICE Discussion Papers 134, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    4. Bindseil, Ulrich & Jabłecki, Juliusz, 2011. "The optimal width of the central bank standing facilities corridor and banks' day-to-day liquidity management," Working Paper Series 1350, European Central Bank.
    5. Jackson, Christopher & Noss, Joseph, 2015. "A heterogeneous agent model for assessing the effects of capital regulation on the interbank money market under a corridor system," Bank of England working papers 548, Bank of England.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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