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Subsidizing human capital to overcome the green paradox: A demand-side approach

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  • Steinkraus, Arne

Abstract

This paper shifts the perspective of the recent green paradox literature towards the demand side. Based on a simple model, I show that a subsidy on input factors in a Cobb-Douglas production function may contribute substantially to postponing resource extraction into the future and, thereby, to limit the future costs of climate change. Specifically, indirect subsidies on human capital, such as investments in education, are plausible policy options to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions because it is robust to short-sighted incentives on the part of politicians and resource owners.

Suggested Citation

  • Steinkraus, Arne, 2016. "Subsidizing human capital to overcome the green paradox: A demand-side approach," Economics Department Working Paper Series 17, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:tbswps:17
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate Change; Green Paradox; Subsidy; Demand-Side;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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