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Women voters and trade protectionism in the interwar years

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  • de Bromhead, Alan

Abstract

This paper examines the lessons of the interwar period to place current concerns regarding a return to protectionism in historical context, highlighting the unique and one-time changes in voting rights that took place during the period and their relationship with trade policy. A particularly novel finding is the impact of women voters on the politics of protectionism. Public opinion survey evidence from the interwar years indicates that women were more likely to hold protectionist attitudes than men, while panel data analysis of average tariff rates during the interwar period shows that when women were entitled to vote tariffs were, on average, higher. This result is supported by an instrumental variables approach using Protestantism as an instrument for female voting rights.

Suggested Citation

  • de Bromhead, Alan, 2015. "Women voters and trade protectionism in the interwar years," QUCEH Working Paper Series 15-03, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:qucehw:1503
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alan de Bromhead & Alan Fernihough & Enda Hargaden, 2018. "Representation Of The People: Franchise Extension And The "Sinn Féin Election" In Ireland, 1918," Working Papers 2018-02, University of Tennessee, Department of Economics.
    2. Kevin Denny & Cormac Ó Gráda, 2016. "Immigration, Asylum, and Gender: Ireland and Beyond," Working Papers 201604, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    political economy; suffrage; international trade; gender differences;

    JEL classification:

    • N40 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N70 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • F50 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - General

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