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European versus Anglo-Saxon credit view: Evidence from the eurozone sovereign debt crisis

Author

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  • Altdörfer, Marc
  • de las Salas Vega, Carlos A.
  • Guettler, Andre
  • Löffler, Gunter

Abstract

We analyse whether different levels of country ties to Europe among the rating agencies Moody's, S&P, and Fitch affect the assignment of sovereign credit ratings, using the Eurozone sovereign debt crisis of 2009-2012 as a natural laboratory. We find that Fitch, the rating agency among the "Big Three" with significantly stronger ties to Europe compared to its two more US-tied peers, assigned on average more favourable ratings to Eurozone issuers during the crisis. However, Fitch's better ratings for Eurozone issuers seem to be neglected by investors as they rather follow the rating actions of Moody's and S&P. Our results thus doubt the often proposed need for an independent European credit rating agency.

Suggested Citation

  • Altdörfer, Marc & de las Salas Vega, Carlos A. & Guettler, Andre & Löffler, Gunter, 2016. "European versus Anglo-Saxon credit view: Evidence from the eurozone sovereign debt crisis," IWH Discussion Papers 34/2016, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:iwhdps:342016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. El-Shagi, Makram & von Schweinitz, Gregor, 2017. "Why they keep missing: An empirical investigation of rational inattention of rating agencies," IWH Discussion Papers 1/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    credit rating agencies; sovereign debt crisis; rating splits; Eurozone;

    JEL classification:

    • F65 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Finance
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage
    • H12 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Crisis Management

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