IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/hwwirp/154.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A spatial computable general equilibrium model for the analysis of regional climate change impacts and adaptation policies

Author

Listed:
  • Jahn, Malte

Abstract

Climate change may affect subnational regions in very different ways. In this paper, a spatial computable general equilibrium (SCGE) model is constructed and a theoretical framework is developed to study impacts of climate change induced extreme weather events and of corresponding adaptation policies on a regional economy, focusing on water-related extreme events. The model makes use of regionalized input-output tables to represent the regional economy and takes into account different zones inside the region which have different socio-economic structures and also different levels of exposure to extreme weather. The model is used to estimate possible spatial effects and regional economic losses of climate change induced ood events in the city of Hamburg, Germany and to evaluate flood adaptation measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Jahn, Malte, 2014. "A spatial computable general equilibrium model for the analysis of regional climate change impacts and adaptation policies," HWWI Research Papers 154, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwirp:154
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/104545/1/791918092.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anas, Alex & Xu, Rong, 1999. "Congestion, Land Use, and Job Dispersion: A General Equilibrium Model," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 451-473, May.
    2. Fabio Farinosi & Lorenzo Carrera & Alexandros Maziotis & Jaroslav Mysiak & Fabio Eboli & Gabriele Standardi, 2012. "Policy-relevant Assessment Method of Socio-economic Impacts of Floods: An Italian Case Study," Working Papers 2012.87, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    3. Alex Anas & Yu Liu, 2007. "A Regional Economy, Land Use, And Transportation Model (Relu-Tran," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 415-455.
    4. Michael Berlemann & Gerit Vogt, 2007. "Kurzfristige Wachstumseffekte von Naturkatastrophen," ifo Working Paper Series 52, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    5. Kowalewski, Julia, 2012. "Regionalization of national input-output tables: Empirical evidence on the use of the FLQ formula," HWWI Research Papers 126, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    6. A. T. Flegg & C. D. Webber, 1997. "On the Appropriate Use of Location Quotients in Generating Regional Input-Output Tables: Reply," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(8), pages 795-805.
    7. repec:hrs:journl::v:3:y:2011:i:2:p:13-25 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Caroline Katsman & A. Sterl & J. Beersma & H. Brink & J. Church & W. Hazeleger & R. Kopp & D. Kroon & J. Kwadijk & R. Lammersen & J. Lowe & M. Oppenheimer & H. Plag & J. Ridley & H. Storch & D. Vaugha, 2011. "Exploring high-end scenarios for local sea level rise to develop flood protection strategies for a low-lying delta—the Netherlands as an example," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 109(3), pages 617-645, December.
    9. Jahn, Malte, 2013. "Economics of extreme weather events in cities: Terminology and regional impact models," HWWI Research Papers 143, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    10. Hiroyuki SHIBUSAWA & Yuzuru MIYATA, 2011. "Evaluating The Dynamic And Spatial Economic Impacts Of An Earthquake: A Cge Application To Japan," Regional Science Inquiry, Hellenic Association of Regional Scientists, vol. 0(2), pages 13-25, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwirp:154. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/hwwiide.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.