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Economics of extreme weather events in cities: Terminology and regional impact models

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  • Jahn, Malte

Abstract

Impacts of extreme weather events are relevant for cities in many aspects. Cities are the cores of economic activity and the amount of people and assets endangered by extreme weather events is large, even under the current climate. A changing climate with changing extreme weather patterns and the process of urbanization will make the whole issue even more relevant in the future. In this paper, definitions and terminology in the field of extreme weather events are discussed. Possible impacts of extreme weather events on cities are collected and the human influences are emphasized. Economic impacts are discusses along a temporal and a sectoral dimension. Finally, common economic impact models are compared, analyzing their strengths and weaknesses.

Suggested Citation

  • Jahn, Malte, 2013. "Economics of extreme weather events in cities: Terminology and regional impact models," HWWI Research Papers 143, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwirp:143
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    1. Hallegatte, Stéphane & Dumas, Patrice, 2009. "Can natural disasters have positive consequences? Investigating the role of embodied technical change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 777-786, January.
    2. Stéphane Hallegatte & Valentin Przyluski, 2010. "The Economics of Natural Disasters," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 11(2), pages 14-24, July.
    3. Adam Rose & Shu-Yi Liao, 2005. "Modeling Regional Economic Resilience to Disasters: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis of Water Service Disruptions," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 75-112.
    4. Michael Berlemann & Gerit Vogt, 2007. "Kurzfristige Wachstumseffekte von Naturkatastrophen," ifo Working Paper Series 52, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    5. Frei, Xenia & Kowalewski, Julia, 2013. "Sektorale und regionale Betroffenheit durch den Klimawandel am Beispiel der Metropolregion Hamburg," HWWI Research Papers 139, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    6. A. T. Flegg & C. D. Webber, 1997. "On the Appropriate Use of Location Quotients in Generating Regional Input-Output Tables: Reply," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(8), pages 795-805.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jahn, Malte, 2014. "A spatial computable general equilibrium model for the analysis of regional climate change impacts and adaptation policies," HWWI Research Papers 154, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).

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