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Market Access and Regional Disparities : New Economic Geography in Europe

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  • Niebuhr, Annekatrin

Abstract

New Economic Geography (NEG) has reached a theoretical consolidation while related empirical tests are still scarce. The present paper aims at providing some evidence on the validity of forces emphasised by NEG. The analysis starts from the nominal wage equation derived from the Krugman ?core-periphery model? and focuses on one of the main propositions of NEG that access advantages raise factor prices. The paper investigates the significance of market access for regional wages and the geographic extent of demand linkages for a cross section of European regions, also taking into account the effects of national borders. The regression analysis covers the period between 1985 and 2000. The results are consistent with the implication of NEG that demand linkages affect the geographic distribution of economic activities, confirming the basic findings of previous analyses. However, regarding the spatial extent of demand linkages, our results differ significantly from previous findings that point to highly localised effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Niebuhr, Annekatrin, 2004. "Market Access and Regional Disparities : New Economic Geography in Europe," HWWA Discussion Papers 269, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwadp:26148
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. H. Hanson, Gordon, 2005. "Market potential, increasing returns and geographic concentration," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 1-24, September.
    6. Paul Krugman, 1992. "A Dynamic Spatial Model," NBER Working Papers 4219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Michael Roos, "undated". "Wages and Market Potential in Germany," Discussion Papers in Economics 00_09, University of Dortmund, Department of Economics.
    8. J.Peter Neary, 2001. "Of Hype and Hyperbolas: Introducing the New Economic Geography," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 536-561, June.
    9. Volker Nitsch, 2000. "National borders and international trade: evidence from the European Union," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1091-1105, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kosfeld, Reinhold & Eckey, Hans-Friedrich & Türck, Matthias, 2005. "New Economic Geography and Regional Price Level," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 78, University of Kassel, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    2. Peter Huber & Michael Pfaffermayr & Yvonne Wolfmayr, 2011. "Are There Border Effects in the EU Wage Function?," DANUBE: Law and Economics Review, European Association Comenius - EACO, issue 2, pages 23-41, June.
    3. Pedro Amaral & Mauro Lemos & Rodrigo Simões & Flávia Chein, 2010. "Regional Imbalances and Market Potential in Brazil," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 463-482.
    4. Reinhold Kosfeld & Hans-Friedrich Eckey, 2010. "Market access, regional price level and wage disparities: the German case," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 30(2), pages 105-128, September.
    5. Dahl, Juliana, 2013. "Innovation and growth in regions with specific geographical features," Kiel Advanced Studies Working Papers 463, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Annekatrin Niebuhr, 2008. "The impact of EU enlargement on European border regions," International Journal of Public Policy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 3(3/4), pages 163-186.
    7. Peter Mayerhofer, 2006. "A Change in Location Advantages in Austria since the Opening of Eastern Europe. On Developments of the Austrian Location Pattern since 1990," Austrian Economic Quarterly, WIFO, vol. 11(3), pages 125-137, September.
    8. Dusan Paredes & Victor Iturra, 2012. "Market Access and wages: A spatially heterogeneous approach," Documentos de Trabajo en Economia y Ciencia Regional 29, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Chile, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2012.
    9. Rafael Alvarado & Miguel Atienza, 2014. "The role of market access and human capital in regional wage disparities: Empirical evidence for Ecuador," Documentos de Trabajo en Economia y Ciencia Regional 50, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Chile, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2014.
    10. Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt & Arne Feddersen, 2010. "From periphery to core: economic adjustments to high speed rail," Working Papers 2010/38, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    11. Brakman, Steven & Garretsen, Harry & Schramm, Marc, 2006. "Putting new economic geography to the test: Free-ness of trade and agglomeration in the EU regions," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 613-635, September.
    12. Peter Mayerhofer, 2006. "Location Patterns Changed in Austria due to Opening of Eastern Europe?," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 79(3), pages 173-186, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    New economic geography; market access; Europe;

    JEL classification:

    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models

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