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Career or flexible work arrangements? Gender differences in self-employment in a young market economy

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  • Buttler, Dominik
  • Sierminska, Eva

Abstract

We examine supply-side determinants of transition from the wage and salary sector to selfemployment of women and men living Poland. The empirical analysis is made possible due to a unique and under explored longitudinal survey -- Social Diagnosis – that contains rare indicators such as job preferences and work events. The empirical results in the 2007-2015 period indicate that women and men transitioning into self-employment are differently motivated. In terms of job attributes, women find independence at work and for those in professional occupations a job matching their competences as a desirable job attribute, while for men the lack of stress, a good salary and independence is key. The analysis of work events and its influence on selfemployment weakly confirms the glass-ceiling hypothesis. In line with other research, our analysis indicates that financial constraints strongly determine the entry into self-employment. A key human capital determinant is past entrepreneurial experience indicating a slow, cautious transition process into self-employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Buttler, Dominik & Sierminska, Eva, 2019. "Career or flexible work arrangements? Gender differences in self-employment in a young market economy," GLO Discussion Paper Series 403, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:403
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Risk; Self-Employment; Work conditions; Gender; Poland;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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