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From Elitist to Sustainable Earnings: Is there a group legitimacy in financial flows?

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  • Charles, Aurelie
  • Vujić, Sunčica

Abstract

Elite occupations are characterised by the magnitude of income accumulation which has been particularly exacerbated in the financialisation process. This paper however shows that the cumulative effects on group earnings is a pattern visible across the labour force. The case studies on the US and UK labour force in the financialisation era in effect show that elitist earnings are a group phenomenon for a dominant group, mainly white male or female, at the expense of other racial, ethnic, and gender groups. Learning from such group behaviour on financial accumulation and drawing on Sen’s rules of legitimacy (1981) in market interactions, the discussion then looks at the possibility of “sustainable earning” trends that feed into the financial needs for the green transition. The paper concludes that economic actors should be aware of the group legitimacy to financial flows, but that the group boundaries should be based on ecological-based entitlements rather than social-based entitlements to financial flows.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles, Aurelie & Vujić, Sunčica, 2018. "From Elitist to Sustainable Earnings: Is there a group legitimacy in financial flows?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 200, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:200
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/177371/1/GLO-DP-0200.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Aurelie Charles & Damiano Sguotti, 2021. "Sustainable Earnings: How Can Herd-behaviour on Financial Accumulation Feed into a Resilient Economic System?," LIS Working papers 811, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    2. Aurelie Charles & Damiano Sguotti, 2021. "Sustainable Earnings: How Can Herd Behavior in Financial Accumulation Feed into a Resilient Economic System?," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(11), pages 1-19, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    elite; income; inequality; social norms; stratification;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models

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