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Do financial reforms complementarity and reforms sequence matter for international capital inflows?

  • Bicaba, Zorobabel T.

As economic reforms are mutually interdependent, a liberal policy package needs internal coherence. How can a coherent reform strategy be achieved for a well-balanced and functional economic system? In this paper, we analyze the relationship between financial reforms coherence and international capital inflows (foreign direct investments (FDI) and portfolio investments). We consider a package of eight financial reforms, comprising interest rate deregulation, credit ceiling and directed-credit programs liberalization, elimination of banking sector entry barriers, privatization of state owed banks, development of security markets and banking sector supervision measures. Complementarity is measured through the reciprocal of the Herfindahl-Hirschman concentration index. The results suggest that the manner with which financial reforms are implemented matters. Particularly, complementarity increases FDI inflows by 0.10%. Moreover, this effect depends on the location of the countries on the distribution of financial reforms level. Indeed, the countries located above the median value of financial reform level experience larger FDI and portfolio investment inflows than others. Finally, when privatization of state owned banks and the adoption of a capital adequacy ratio based on the Basle I standard occur after other preliminary financial reforms, the returns to complementarity are higher. In others words, a developed and relatively safe domestic financial system attracts more FDI and portfolio investments than a developed but unsafe financial system.

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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics in its series Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 with number 12.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:gdec11:12
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  1. Fabrizio Coricelli & Mathilde Maurel, 2011. "Growth and Crisis in Transition: A Comparative Perspective," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 49-64, 02.
  2. Ashoka Mody & Abdul Abiad, 2003. "Financial Reform; What Shakes it? What Shapes it?," IMF Working Papers 03/70, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Oliveira Martins, Joaquim & De Macedo, Jorge Braga, 2008. "Growth, Reform Indicators and Policy Complementarities," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/7960, Paris Dauphine University.
  4. Laura Alfaro & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Vadym Volosovych, 2005. "Capital Flows in a Globalized World: The Role of Policies and Institutions," NBER Working Papers 11696, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Enrica Detragiache & Abdul Abiad & Thierry Tressel, 2008. "A New Database of Financial Reforms," IMF Working Papers 08/266, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Eric Neumayer & Laura Spess, 2004. "Do bilateral investment treaties increase foreign direct investment to developing countries?," International Finance 0411004, EconWPA, revised 10 May 2005.
  7. M. Ayhan Kose & Kenneth Rogoff & Eswar Prasad & Shang-Jin Wei, 2003. "Effects of Financial Globalization on Developing Countries; Some Empirical Evidence," IMF Occasional Papers 220, International Monetary Fund.
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